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Top prospect: Tyler Boyd

| Saturday, June 30, 2012, 10:36 p.m.
Clairton's Tyler Boyd rushed for 2,400 yards and 48 TDs for the WPIAL and PIAA Class A Bears last fall. Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review

TYLER BOYD

6-foot-2, 175 pounds, WR/S, Clairton

About the same time Belle Vernon four-star left tackle Dorian Johnson stunned Pitt and West Virginia by making a verbal commitment to Penn State last Sunday, a future Nittany Lion was making an indelible impression on Clairton star Tyler Boyd.

Boyd played wide receiver on the Northeast team that won the seven-on-seven tournament at the Rivals100 Five Star Challenge at Lakewood Stadium in Atlanta and spent the weekend catching passes from Penn State recruit Christian Hackenberg.

After watching Boyd and Hackenberg work together, Rivals.com national recruiting analyst Mike Farrell went so far as to say, “I think Penn State is probably the team to beat for Tyler Boyd.”

“The worst thing in the world for Pitt could have been Tyler Boyd going down there and catching passes from Hackenberg,” Farrell said. “They worked together like they had been a pass-catching combination for years. It was an instantaneous connection.”

Boyd has 21 scholarship offers, including from Pitt, Penn State, West Virginia and Virginia Tech. He is making an unofficial visit to Southern Cal this weekend in hopes of adding a scholarship offer from the Trojans and plans to visit University Park soon.

Boyd admits playing with Hackenberg intrigues him.

“My first time meeting him, we had a connection,” Boyd said of the 6-foot-4, 215-pound four-star quarterback from Fork Union (Va.) Military Academy. “I love his arm strength. His balls were so on the money. He puts the ball where it should be on every pass. He was my closest friend there.

“It definitely has an impact on my recruitment.”

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