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Local cousins battle for 1st and last time as varsity football starters

| Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, 8:57 p.m.
Pine Creek Journal
Submitted Shaler quarterback Brad Good, left and his cousin Jake Good, of Pine-Richland had the cance to play against each other on the junior varsity level, and in the homecoming game for Shaler met for the only time as varsity starters.

Homecoming games mean different things to different people. For some, it is a chance to get the community together, but for the Good family, it was a chance — and probably the last one — to see two of its members play against each other.

When Pine-Richland and Shaler met two weeks ago, Titans quarterback Brad Good, a senior, played against his cousin Jake Good, a sophomore defensive lineman from Pine-Richland, for the first and last time as varsity starters.

Pine-Richland needed a win to stay in the playoff chase, while Shaler needed its first win. But, stakes aside, the cousins looked forward to sharing the field.

“It was pretty neat looking across the line each play and seeing Jake looking back at me,” Brad said. “I knew I had to avoid him.”

Brad never wants to get sacked, but no Pine-Richland player could remind him of a sack on a regular basis the way Jake can.

“We are together at a lot of family parties, and it is kind of a bragging right (thing),” Brad said. “He definitely did not sack me. My line did a pretty good job keeping him away.”

Brad said it was great having the whole family at one game, as usually they divide to watch one or the other.

“It was awesome to play against Brad,” Jake said. “My cousin and I have been close as long as I can remember. I remember him coming to my birthday parties when I was really young, so this was a cool experience.”

Jake said there was a little trash talk between himself and Brad's center before a few snaps, and the sophomore had no problem admitting that his cousin is quick and can be hard to catch.

Jake had moment of conflict when his cousin and one of his teammates got into an argument, but he said, on the field, it's team first. But that moment aside, it's always family first.

Unfortunately, Brad injured his ankle during the game, so the cousins didn't have a chance to meet and shake hands afterward, something that bothered them both.

Although the ending wasn't what they had hoped, neither will forget the one varsity game they got to play in as opponents.

Jerry Clark is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-779-6979 or jeclark@tribweb.com.

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