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High school roundup: North Hills hires assistant coach to replace Jack McCurry

| Monday, Feb. 18, 2013, 9:45 p.m.

North Hills hired Pat Carey as head football coach Monday, choosing the veteran assistant to replace Jack McCurry in a long-expected move.

A 1988 North Hills graduate, Carey had been the Indians' assistant head coach and defensive coordinator since 1998. McCurry, one of the WPIAL's most successful coaches, resigned in January after 35 seasons.

Carey was the AFLAC National Assistant Coach of the Year in 2003. Before becoming assistant head coach, Carey instructed outside linebackers and receivers.

“Pat Carey has been an integral part of North Hills football for 17 seasons,” North Hills superintendent Patrick J. Mannarino said in a statement announcing the hire. “There is no doubt that he is the perfect person to lead our athletes and continue the program's tradition of excellence.”

Carey captained North Hills' undefeated 1987 team that finished first in national rankings by USA Today. A four-year letterman at James Madison, Carey has taught health and physical education classes at North Hills since 1994.

McCurry had a 281-108-9 record and four WPIAL titles.

“Pat Carey fits the mold of what is a long line of outstanding coaches at North Hills,” athletic director Dan Cardone said. “The foundation, which he helped establish, is in place ... to have a long and successful tenure.”

Boys basketball

Perry 80, Obama Academy 79 (OT) — Devin Lyles scored 19 points including the winning free throws with eight seconds left in overtime to give Perry (12-12) a win in the City League semifinals. D.J. Porter had 26 for top-seeded Obama (16-3).

Westinghouse 68, Brashear 47 — Robert Bailey scored 30 points to guide No. 3 Westinghouse (14-8) to a victory in the City League semifinals.

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