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Southmoreland's Beistel is player to be feared on both sides of the ball

| Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, 12:31 a.m.
Jason Black | Daily Courier
Sophomore Jacob Beistel has emerged as a leader for the Southmoreland football team.

Jacob Beistel seems to have a motor that never quits, and that's great news for the Southmoreland football team.

Beistel, a sophomore, is already making his mark on the gridiron with the Scotties. After earning All-Interstate Conference honors as a freshman, Beistel certainly is ready for the start of the 2013 season.

“He is just tenacious in everything he does,” said new Southmoreland football coach Mark Adams. “His intensity is unmatched. When I look at good athletes, he is one of those kids that stand out. He is only a sophomore, but the team rallies around him.”

Beistel earned WPIAL runner-up honors as a heavyweight wrestler as a freshman, and he approaches football in much the same way he does wrestling.

“I definitely just try to always be aggressive in football, just like in wrestling,” Beistel said.

Adams noted that the play of Beistel as an offensive guard and linebacker is something that he and his assistant coaches constantly have to monitor.

“We have to quick-whistle him in practice,” Adams said. “As an offensive guard, he is extremely fast and extremely strong.

“For a sophomore to be where he is at is almost unheard of. As a linebacker, he is as mean as they come. As soon as he is on that side of the ball, he just gets nasty.”

Adams loves the attitude that Beistel constantly brings to the field.

“His nature is to have success, and he knows how to win,” Adams said. “He is the type of kid I would take into battle anytime.”

While Beistel is still growing as a football player, he certainly doesn't shy away from taking on a leadership role.

“I try to lead as much as I can,” Beistel said. “I try to get people up when they are down. I just try to lead by example.”

Beistel credits much of his success to the Southmoreland coaching staff, and he believes that the Scotties could be a legitimate challenger for a postseason spot.

“If we play the way we should play, we can make the playoffs,” Beistel said.

While he is extremely intense on the field, Beistel shows a different side when he is not in competition.

“He's got a smile that lasts forever, and he's got a big heart,” Adams said.

But make no mistake, Beistel will be ready to dominate in 2013, beginning with the season opener at home against Jeannette.

“I just can't wait to go out there and play that first game,” Beistel said.

Jason Black is the local sports editor of the Daily Courier. He can be reached at jblack@tribweb.com.

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