Share This Page

Valley News Dispatch Q&A: Apollo-Ridge's Lonny Wells Jr.

| Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013, 10:27 p.m.
Bill Shirley | For The Valley News Dispatch
Apollo Ridge's Lonny Wells Jr. (left) breaks tackles and runs away from Springdale defenders during a game Friday night, Oct. 4, 2013, at Springdale Veterans Memorial Field.

When his senior season arrived, Apollo-Ridge running back/linebacker/kicker Lonny Wells Jr., a four-year starter, could have expected and maybe even demanded that more attention and action than ever come his way.

But Wells Jr. understands the concepts of sacrifice, modesty and leadership better than most.

Well before the 5-foot-10, 190-pounder became one reason for the success of the Vikings (4-2, 3-2), his father, Marine Sgt. Lonny Wells Sr., served eight years in the military. Wells Sr. was killed Nov. 9, 2004, in combat in Fallujah, Iraq.

The son brings a balance of speed and strength to the field, but his willingness to share the spotlight with Apollo-Ridge's numerous standout underclassmen rather than clash over carries is just as vital.

In last week's 42-0 win over Springdale, Wells had his best showing of the season, as he gained 67 yards and scored twice on three carries. He added four tackles in the shutout.

For the season, Wells has 12 rushes for 100 yards — he is one of eight Apollo-Ridge players with at least 100 yards of offense. He also has 18 tackles.

In his career, he has 95 carries for 434 yards and four touchdowns, and 101 tackles. He also handles kicking duties.

Q: Do you have to swallow your pride a bit to play in this offense?

A: It's fine. I'm a team player. It doesn't matter to me. If we win, that's all that matters at the end of the night.

Q: How would you compare your running style to the team's other ball carriers?

A: When I run the ball, I'm not all finesse and stuff. I like downhill running. Jonah (Casella) and Duane (Brown) are more finesse kind of guys.

Q: What does it mean to be named after your dad, considering what he did?

A: It means a lot. Just to play for him every night, it means a lot to me.

Q: Do you have a tattoo or some other tribute to him?

A: I have a tattoo on my back. It's his last name — our last name.

Q: Does having his name put extra pressure on you?

A: Not really. I know what I can do, and I want to be like him. But I also want to be better. I want to move forward.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.