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Daily News Q&A: Woodland Hills' Miles Sanders

| Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, 1:03 p.m.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Woodland Hills' Miles Sanders escapes a tackle attempt by Bethel Park's Alexander Minton on a 79-yard touchdown run in the first half on Friday, Sept. 13, 2013.

Woodland Hills just keeps running out the talent.

Recognized in recent years for having the most active NFL players, Woodland Hills (4-2, 4-1 Quad Central Conference) will be seeking its fifth consecutive victory on Friday at Canon-McMillan after starting the year 0-2.

One reason for the surging Wolverines' success is the play of sophomore running back Miles Sanders, who is coming off a career-high 247-yard rushing effort in a 42-21 victory over Baldwin.

The 6-foot, 183-pound Sanders, who scored three touchdowns in the latest victory, with 869 yards has surpassed his rushing total of more than 700 during his freshman year in 2012.

Q: What's the past two years been like for you, personally, as a young player in such a prominent role?

A: It's been an honor just playing for Woodland Hills and being a part of the team the way I was as a freshman last year. I just want to keep it going.

Q: Do you have a favorite player, possibly someone you try to emulate?

A: My cousin, Josh Powell, used to play at Woodland Hills. I watched how he went about things as a senior. He graduated in 2009. That's when I used to come to all the games. I also have learned a lot from our running backs coach, James Whitehurst.

Q: How does it make you feel to be playing for a legendary figure, such as coach (George) Novak, and for a high school that has produced so many great football players?

A: Just knowing that I can probably make it somewhere playing for this team, I want to keep doing what I need to do. I'm a good student and I'm doing my work. I'm just trying to do what I can to make something happen, to reach my future goals, which start with going to college.

Q: If you could trade places with someone for a day, who would it be?

A: If it could be anybody, it might be (Steelers coach) Mike Tomlin.

Q: What type of music do you listen to the most?

A: Hip hop. But I listen to a lot of different stuff. I like Michael Jackson's music.

Q: What is your favorite college football team?

A: Florida State. I like how they play. And then, there's the ACC. My big brother (Brian Sanders) just always wanted to go to Florida State.

Q: What have you been able to learn from the older guys on your team?

A: Right now, our team is really together. We started off slow, but we just kept saying that we'll start winning. And we have.

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