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No. 3 Mt. Pleasant, Mellors thump No. 5 Washington

| Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, 11:09 p.m.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant defensive back Ryan Gumbita returns the first of his two first-half interceptions versus Washington on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant defensive back Ryan Ballew breaks up a pass intended for Washington wide receiver Quorteze Levy during their Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, contest in Washington.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant running back Tyler Mellors dives for a 3-yard touchdown during their October 11, 2013 contest versus Washington in Washington.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Washington's Chase Caldwell attempts to fight through the tackle of Mt. Pleasant defensive end Marcus Malara during their October 11, 2013 contest in Washington.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant running back Tyler Mellors breaks into the Washington secondary Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant linebacker Luke Liprando pulls down Washington's Chase Caldwell in the backfield during their October 11, 2013 contest in Washington.
Eric Schmadel | Tribune-Review
Mt. Pleasant running back Brett Fess jukes Washington cornerback DeQuay Isbel on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in Washington.

Tyler Mellors will remember this one for a long time.

“My back,” Mellors said, grimacing. “I feel like I'm 90 right now.”

Didn't look that way.

Mt. Pleasant's senior running back became the school's all-time rushing leader with 216 yards and a total of six touchdowns during a 47-22 dismantling of No. 5 Washington that secured the Class AA Interstate Conference title for the third-ranked Vikings.

“You have to go with your workhorse,” Mt. Pleasant coach Bo Ruffner said. “He's our horse, and we rode him tonight.”

Mellors entered the game needing 50 yards to break the career mark, and he checked that one off the list on Mt. Pleasant's third drive.

Bob Gorinski (Class of 1970) had it previously with 3,350 yards. The 5-foot-8, 170-pound Mellors now has 3,517 after clearing 200 yards for the third consecutive week.

“I thought they played with more emotion and played more physical than us,” Washington coach Mike Bosnic said.

Vikings quarterback Ryan Gumbita completed five of seven passes for 128 yards and two touchdowns. He also had two interceptions on defense.

“We knew we could get some yards on them passing,” Gumbita said. “We thought they would be keying on (Mellors).”

Prexies quarterback Jonathan Spina ran for a pair of touchdowns, and fullback Arthur Long ran seven times for 68 yards and a score.

Washington (6-1, 6-1), which was playing without ineligible lineman Zach Blystone, took a 7-0 lead after a 1-yard scoring run from Spina.

Mellors capped Mt. Pleasant's next possession with a 3-yard run and broke the school record during a drive that ended with Gumbita's 17-yard scoring strike to Luke Liprando.

Mellors ran for a score and caught a pass in the flat from Gumbita for a 27-7 halftime lead.

After keeping Mt. Pleasant (7-0, 7-0) comfortably ahead with a pair of touchdown runs in the third quarter, Mellors delivered his knockout punch: a 93-yarder early in the fourth that turned this into an unexpected blowout.

Jason Mackey is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at jmackey@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Mackey_Trib.

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