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Pittsburgh Tribune-Review Q&A: Baldwin's Brandon Schleicher

| Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, 9:33 p.m.
Randy Jarosz | For Trib Total Media
Baldwin's Brandon Schleicher

Baldwin quarterback Brandon Schleicher accounted for almost 400 yards in a 45-22 win Friday against Butler.

Schleicher, a 5-foot-10, 170-pound senior who played wide receiver in 2014, connected on 16 of 25 passes for 264 yards and four touchdowns. He an for 130 yards on 10 carries and scored twice on the ground — including a 54-yard run for Baldwin (1-1).

“The kid is a competitor, and I can't say enough about the positive attitude and play-making ability he brings to the field,” coach Pete Wagner said. “That's his second high school game as a quarterback, and it was a pretty impressive performance he put on.”

Q: Was that your best individual performance ever?

A: I'd have to say it was one of my best performances ever. It was a lot of fun with the (Friday night) atmosphere. There's no better feeling than being under those lights.

Q: How does it feel to have one of the best offensive performances in school history in only your second game at quarterback?

A: It's the greatest feeling; people look at you differently when you walk down the halls. I couldn't have done it without my team though. They played a huge part in my performance.

Q: Have you ever played quarterback before?

A: I played quarterback in middle school, but it was nothing like a varsity football game.

Q: Do you consider yourself a better passer or runner (or receiver)?

A: That's a tough question considering I made most of my plays on the run Friday night. But I'm not afraid to stand in the pocket and make a pass.

Q: Do you think playing wide receiver last year helps you at quarterback?

A: (It) has helped me make the transition to quarterback. It gave me a greater understanding of the routes.

Q: Who do you consider as role models?

A: I consider my brother (Joe) one of my biggest role models. He's always been there for me and overall is a great person. He also was a quarterback in high school, so he'll give me some tips week to week.

Q: Who is your favorite NFL player?

A: My favorite NFL player is Big Ben. His ability to handle pressure and make plays with players hanging on him is encouraging, and I try to play my game like him. I have never met Big Ben. That's always been a dream of mine.

Q: What is the outlook for the team in conference play?

A: We will play every team hard. We're looking to be contenders this year.

Q: What do you know about this week's opponent, Mt. Lebanon?

A: Mt. Lebanon is a great team. They have a lot of weapons and a strong defensive line with some big boys.

Ray Fisher is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at rfisher@tribweb.com.

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