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Sewickley Academy athletes sign with colleges

| Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016, 1:12 a.m.
Sewickley Academy seniors, from left, Grace Guerin, Luke Ross, Ben Mulholland and Griffin Mackey stand together for a photo during the Athletic College Fall Signing Ceremony on Friday, Nov. 11, 2016. Guerin will be attending Lafayette College for lacrosse; Ross will go to Georgetown University for tennis; Mulholland will head to Washington & Lee University for lacrosse; and Mackey will go to Dartmouth College for cross country.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Sewickley Academy seniors, from left, Grace Guerin, Luke Ross, Ben Mulholland and Griffin Mackey stand together for a photo during the Athletic College Fall Signing Ceremony on Friday, Nov. 11, 2016. Guerin will be attending Lafayette College for lacrosse; Ross will go to Georgetown University for tennis; Mulholland will head to Washington & Lee University for lacrosse; and Mackey will go to Dartmouth College for cross country.

Four Sewickley Academy seniors committed to colleges for next year.

Grace Guerin (Lafayette lacrosse), Ben Mulholland (Washington & Lee lacrosse), Griffin Mackey (Dartmouth track and cross country) and Luke Ross (Georgetown tennis) were part of a signing ceremony Friday at Sewickley Academy's new Events Center-Hall of Fame.

Guerin, a midfielder, has 63 goals and 27 assists in her career with the Panthers and will join older sister Kayla with the Leopards.

“(Lafayette) is a small school in a fun college town (Easton), which is what I was looking for,” said Guerin, 17, of Sewickley. “The campus is beautiful, and I love the coach and the team.”

Panthers coach Cheryl Ann Lassen expects Guerin, the daughter of Penguins assistant general manager and former player Bill Guerin, to thrive in college.

“Grace is a well-rounded player who is versatile on both ends of the field and has the passion for lacrosse,” Lassen said. “She is a team player (who) will be very successful in the next level.”

Guerin plans to study biology and become a physician.

Mulholland, an attack and midfielder, has done it all for the Panthers with 85 goals and 39 assists, plus 116 ground balls.

“He isn't just doing the scoring, he is willing to get down in the mud and do the dirty work,” Panthers coach Tim Hastings said.

Mulholland, 18, of Sewickley will join a Washington & Lee men's squad that reached the second round of the NCAA Division III tournament last spring and tied a school record with 16 wins.

“I wanted to be in a place that offered a strong curriculum and also had a competitive team,” he said.

Mulholland plans to study chemistry and biology and is considering becoming a pediatrician.

Mackey was 2015 PIAA Class A boys cross country champion and led the Panthers to two WPIAL titles.

He liked Dartmouth so much, he canceled visits to other schools.

“I fell in love with Dartmouth,” said Mackey, 18, of Sewickley. “I really liked the coaching staff and runners.”

Panthers cross country coach Derek Chimner said Mackey, who competed this season with an injured foot, is mentally strong and expects that to help him with the Big Green.

Mackey plans to major in history and political science.

Ross, a two-time WPIAL champion, won the PIAA Class AA singles title last spring after missing the previous season to train in Florida.

He led the Panthers to their 13th consecutive WPIAL team title and a first-place finish at the PIAA championship.

Panthers coach Whitney Snyder said Ross, who was heavily recruited, was wise in choosing a school that ranks among the best in the nation academically.

Ross, 18, of Sewickley, plans to study pre-med and said Georgetown is perfect for him.

Karen Kadilak is a freelance writer.

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