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Penn-Trafford's Kreutzberger commits to Radford

Bill Beckner Jr.
| Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, 8:48 p.m.
Norwin's Zach Tusay (14) battles Penn-Trafford's Austin Kreutzberger for ball during their game Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in Harrison City.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Norwin's Zach Tusay (14) battles Penn-Trafford's Austin Kreutzberger for ball during their game Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in Harrison City.
Penn Trafford's Austin Kreutzberger (7) against Penn Hills during a pre-season scrimmage on Wednesday Aug. 23, 2017 at Penn-Trafford.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Penn Trafford's Austin Kreutzberger (7) against Penn Hills during a pre-season scrimmage on Wednesday Aug. 23, 2017 at Penn-Trafford.

Penn-Trafford senior Austin Kreutzberger heard through casual talk in cup soccer circles that Radford University had a strong men's program. But it wasn't until he visited the campus during the spring and picked up a scholarship offer that he really started doing research on the Virginia school.

Now, there is not a better program in the world in his eyes.

A senior midfielder, Kreutzberger gave the Highlanders a verbal commitment. It was his only Division I offer, although he had interest from several other schools.

Radford plays in the Big South Conference. The Highlanders, who reached a No. 20 ranking in the nation last year, finished 14-4-2, and won regular season and conference tournament titles. They have six consecutive winning seasons. Coastal Carolina clipped Radford, 2-1, in the first round of the NCAA Tournament.

Kreutzberger is used to a perennial playoff team at Penn-Trafford and hopes to continue the postseason trend with Radford, under new coach Bryheem Hancock. He was hired in March after the resignation of Marc Reeves in February. Reeves took the head coaching job at Elon.

“I heard about how good they were; that they were a top-25 program,” Kreutzberger said. “I really liked the campus, and they have a new coach. I am looking forward to being a part of the program. I think I can fit right in.”

Penn-Trafford coach Rick Nese said one of Kreutzberger's best skills is his touch.

“Quick touches on the ball in tight spaces,” the coach said. “That helps him escape pressure, and he has the ability to play accurate, long passes to unbalanced defenses.”

A 40-plus career goal-scorer, Kreutzberger has seven scores (and five assists) this season to lead the playoff-bound Warriors. He was playing for the Arsenel FC club team during his sophomore year when Radford began scouting him.

The offer came this spring, and he waited a while to see if any other schools pursued him. Instead, Radford stayed with him, and he decided to reciprocate.

“I have always wanted to play college soccer,” said Kreutzberger, who now plays for Northern Steel. “Radford has a great business program, and I want to be a financial consultant, so it's a good fit.”

Bill Beckner Jr. is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at bbeckner@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BillBeckner.

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