Share This Page

Despite Pitt pressure, Foster won't reconsider Alabama commitment

| Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

If Robert Foster was going to change his commitment from Alabama to Pitt, Friday would have been the day.

Panthers assistant coaches Bobby Engram and Desmond Robinson visited Central Valley in a last-ditch effort to convince him to pick Pitt.

Then Foster attended the Mercury Award banquet at the Pittsburgh Athletic Association, where the guest speakers included Pitt coach Paul Chryst and former Panthers coaches Johnny Majors and Jackie Sherrill, as well as Pitt's prized recruit, Tyler Boyd of Clairton.

Afterward, Foster affirmed he was sticking with the two-time defending BCS national champion Crimson Tide.

“There's a lot of people that say I'm going to decommit, but I'm real comfortable with my relationship with Alabama and coach (Nick) Saban, and I want to make a name for myself,” Foster said.

“I'm 100 percent sure I'm going to be going to the University of Alabama.”

Foster was visibly torn when he announced Dec. 21 that he would attend Alabama, picking the Tide over the Panthers.

But playing alongside several future teammates in the Under Armour All-America Game earlier this month in Orlando, Fla., convinced the top-five receiver prospect that he made the right choice.

“There was a lot of pressure because a lot of athletes decommitted at the game,” Foster said. “We formed a friendship while we were there. We executed well as a family and represented the college we're committed to.”

A few days later, he watched Alabama hammer Notre Dame to win the BCS national title and couldn't help but envision his future.

“It was very exciting — the college I committed to just won the national championship,” Foster said. “Hopefully I can be there again next year and help us win another crystal ball.”

Pitt coaches wanted to make sure they hadn't done anything wrong in their recruitment of Foster, as they are going to pursue Central Valley sophomore Jordan Whitehead.

Foster's father complained about how Pitt supporters reacted to his son's decision.

“A lot of negativity is coming out of Pittsburgh from the fans,” Robert Foster II said. “All you ever heard was how he'd be a great fit for Pitt. Now that he decides to take his talents elsewhere, you hear the negativity. Just be happy for him.”

Foster expected nothing less but promised to make his hometown proud.

“I'll always represent Pittsburgh,” Foster said, “no matter which college I go to.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.