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Hampton's Luther twins have multiple decisions

| Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, 10:54 p.m.

ryan Luther was getting used to being asked whether he and his twin brother Colin would play college basketball together or go their separate ways.

“Everyone always asks me if that's a big part of my decision,” Ryan said. “That would be a special thing, just to play with your brother and have your family at the same game cheering for each other. But I don't think it'd be a problem if we didn't.

“If we both like the same place, great. If not, it's not going to make me change my mind.”

The Hampton stars took official visits to Duquesne and George Washington, so playing together is a possibility.

What complicates matters is that Ryan, a 6-foot-8 wing-forward, is being recruited harder than Colin, a 6-foot-6 12 combination guard.

Where Ryan has the ability to play in the paint and shoot from the perimeter, he needs to improve his ball handling.

Colin, on the other hand, has point guard skills and can beat opponents off the dribble.

He's not as polished as Ryan, but is a strong defender who takes advantage of his size and being a left-hander who challenges shots.

“Truthfully, I think that the sky is the limit for both players,” Hampton coach Joe Lafko said. “They have so much potential to become exceptional college players. I'm excited for them to have the opportunity to develop their games from their skill levels and their strength.

“Any school that gets Ryan or Colin as a player will benefit from their dedication to the program, their excellent academics and also their ability to contribute and help their team win.”

Ryan already had visited Dayton — which offered first and is believed to be the frontrunner — when Pitt entered the mix.

The Panthers offered Ryan a scholarship two weeks ago. He took an unofficial visit to Pitt's campus and toured Petersen Events Center last week.

“It was good,” Ryan said. “I wouldn't say I was close to making a decision, but I probably knew the top two or three schools I wanted to go to (when Pitt offered). I don't know if I was surprised. I'm kind of excited.”

Ryan has been described as a “stretch four” — a power forward with perimeter range — and is similar in size and shooting ability to former Beaver Falls star Sheldon Jeter, who committed to the Panthers during an official visit last weekend.

Will Jeter's commitment affect Luther's decision?

“Everyone always asks me that,” Ryan said.

“I haven't seen him play much so I don't know how similar of players we are, but if Pitt is recruiting me then they're not worried about it.”

Nor are the Luther twins, who have multiple decisions to make.

Kevin Gorman is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at kgorman@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KGorman_Trib.

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