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Trib Prospect: Pine-Richland's Ben DiNucci

| Saturday, May 24, 2014, 10:00 p.m.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pine-Richland quarterback Ben DiNucci rolls out to pass during the first quarter of a Quad North game against Seneca Valley on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013, in Pine.

Before Pine-Richland's Ben DiNucci could attract multiple scholarship offers, the 2015 graduate needed his first.

“It's almost like a validation thing,” Pine-Richland coach Eric Kasperowicz said. “Every recruiter that I talk to, generally speaking, the No. 1 question that they ask is: What other offers do they have?”

Now DiNucci can list Akron and James Madison. When Kasperowicz hosted recruiters at a workout day earlier this month for DiNucci and several other Rams, Akron offered immediately. James Madison followed last week.

“(Akron's coach) was actually surprised that Pitt, Penn State, all the big programs weren't after him,” Kasperowicz said.

DiNucci completed 72 percent of his passes last season (169 of 235). He had 2,147 passing yards with 15 touchdowns.

“Above all else, (college coaches) like his accuracy and his arm strength,” Kasperowicz said. “The other thing everybody consistently says about him is his ability to extend the play. ... Straight-line speed, he's really fast. Probably one of our fastest guys on the team.”

— Chris Harlan

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