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Valley News Dispatch Spotlight Athletes: Kiski Area's Ben Kinnamon, Knoch's Codi Reed

| Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 1:16 a.m.
Kiski Area's Ben Kinnamon
Knoch's Codi Reed

Ben Kinnamon

School: Kiski Area

Class: Junior

Sport: Track and field

Report card: Kinnamon won the 200 meters, took second in the 100 and ran a leg for the winning 400-meter relay team at the Westmoreland County Coaches Association Championships on Saturday at Latrobe.

Going into the event in Latrobe, which event were you most confident running?

The 200-meter.

Is that your favorite race?

It's always been my favorite race. I've always done better in it than other races.

Is there an event that you haven't competed in that you might like to try?

I'd be interested in doing the 400-meter race. Just like the 200, I like a little longer distance.

Do you have any routines or rituals before an event?

Not really. I just make sure I get stretched out before a race.

— Dave Yohe

Codi Reed

School: Knoch

Class: Junior

Sport: Softball

Report card: The junior pitcher has knocked in 37 runs while batting .451 with three home runs. She also is 7-2 with 26 strikeouts.

Has this year gone the way you expected it to?

Honestly, this year has gone better than I expected it to. Our team has really grown as a family, and I think that's really important for game play. We have each other's backs on and off the field.

Do you play any other sports at Knoch?

I do not. I am in orchestra, but that's about it. I play the clarinet.

The team opened up the season playing games in Kentucky. What was the experience like playing against teams you knew absolutely nothing about?

I loved the adrenaline rush. The intensity level was a lot calmer. We found our groove and went with it, and made it to the championship game.

—D.J. Vasil

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