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Alle-Kiski Spotlight Athletes: Knoch's Brandon Grumski, Highlands' Kyla Kelley

| Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, 1:01 a.m.
Knoch cross country runner Brandon Grumski
Highlands freshman cross country runner Kyla Kelley

Brandon Grumski

School: Knoch

Class: Sophomore

Sport: Cross country

Report card: Grumski qualified for the PIAA championships following his fifth-place finish at the WPIAL Class AA championships. He bettered last year's finish by 14 spots.

What did you do differently this year that enabled you to move up so many spots from last year?

I had a lot more training. It was also experience. I had a lot of motivation to do better. You just want to keep getting better.

What were your goals for this season? Where are you in realizing those goals?

My goal was to place around top-five in the WPIAL and make it to states. I also want to medal at states. That's going to be a challenge, but I still want to do it. My goal has almost been completed so far. I just have one more.

What kind of routine do you have before a race?

I try to relax as much as I can. I warm up and stretch. We do a sprint then we do our chant.

What is your main focus while you're in the middle of an event?

In the middle of a race, I try to not let any people pass me. I try to pass as many kids as I can.

What does your training regimen consist of?

In the offseason I try to get four days of running. I also play a different sport to kind of get a break from that. I play ice hockey. This is the first year I'm going to try diving. When track season comes around, I do that.

—Dave Yohe

Kyla Kelley

School: Highlands

Class: Freshman

Sport: Cross country

Report card: Kelley is the second girl in Highlands girls cross country history to make the PIAA championship. She qualified with a 23rd-place finish in the WPIAL Class AA championships. She also is a starting midfielder on the girls soccer team. She had three goals this season.

Soccer and cross country are two sports in the same season. How did you balance the time to give to both sports?

I split time between practices, and whenever I had a soccer game I would go to just the game and not run cross country. When I had a meet, I would skip soccer, but most of the meets were on Saturdays.

What gets you through a run since you're not able to listen to music during a meet?

I'd say having people in front of me bothers me so its just motivation to keep on going.

How does running cross country help with playing soccer and vice versa?

Running cross country helps me get endurance for how much running I have to do on the soccer field. Conditioning work for soccer helped out with cross country. It's the best of both worlds.

Do you plan on playing a third sport later this year?

I'll do track. I want to do long jump and some distance events.

— D.J. Vasil

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