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Valley high school roundup: Deer Lakes boys use 3-pointers to end losing streak

| Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, 12:06 a.m.
Bill Shirley | For The Valley News Dispatch
Knoch's David Gallagher (left) drives to the basket against Hampton's Collin Luther on Monday, Dec. 22, 2013, at Knoch.

Deer Lakes let the 3-pointers fly on the way to breaking a five-game losing streak.

The Lancers boys basketball team fired in 10 3-pointers and posted their first victory since opening night, beating Karns City, 57-40, in a nonsection game Monday in West Deer.

The game also was the team's home opener.

Four Deer Lakes (2-5) players made two 3-pointers. Scott Ventura led the Lancers with 17 points. Cory Pampena didn't hit a 3 but made all seven of his free throws and chipped in 11 points.

Deer Lakes held Karns City to three points in the second quarter.

Hampton 77, Knoch 38 — Class AAAA No. 1 Hampton (8-0) started fast and handed host Knoch (6-1) its first loss of the season in a nonsection game. Pitt recruit Ryan Luther scored a game-high 23 points for the Talbots, who led 26-4 after the first quarter.

Jack Obringer added 12 points and David Huber had 11 for Hampton.

David Gallagher led Knoch with 16 points.

Neshannock 87, Ford City 45 — Jesse Sequeira and Blake Bower scored 11 points each for Ford City (4-4), but it wasn't enough in a nonsection loss to Neshannock (6-1), which had 12 players score.

Matt McKinney scored 22 points, and Ernie Burkes had 21 for the Lancers. That duo combined for seven 3-pointers.

Girls basketball

Hampton 64, Kiski Area 12 — Lexi Griggs scored 15 points and grabbed 13 rebounds for the Talbots (4-3) in a nonsection win over Kiski Area (0-7).

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