Share This Page

Shaler working from clean slate under new head coach

| Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, 8:24 p.m.
Christopher Horner
Shaler coach Chris Siegle with quarterback Brad Good. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Shaler's Wayde Barkey. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Shaler quarterback Brad Good. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Shaler coach Chris Siegle. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Shaler's Cody Kernic. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review

Every season brings a clean slate in a sense for every team, but in the case of Shaler football, the slate couldn't be cleaner.

The team lost veteran coach Neil Gordon as well as star quarterback Ryan Mincher and jack-of-all-trades tight end/fullback/linebacker J.P. Holtz, who will play for Pitt this fall.

Leading rusher Niko Thorpe also transferred to Central Catholic.

The task of rebuilding the program was awarded to former Shaler quarterback Chris Siegle. The 1998 graduate spent several years playing and coaching in the college ranks and said the Shaler job was the only high school position he wanted.

“It's going to be tough to replace guys like Holtz and Mincher, but I will prepare the young kids and coach them up to the standard,” Siegle said.

The goal Siegle is shooting for is to get the new players to buy into him and his system and not dwell on the past.

“If I am doing the right things, the kids will see that and buy into that,” he said. “I am hoping that starts the domino effect.”

Shaler will begin to replace the loss of so many weapons on offense as senior quarterback Brad Good and junior signal-caller Josh Crawford will battle for the starting quarterback position. In the backfield, four players will help spearhead the attack; seniors Wayde Barkey and Cody Kernic will compete for carries with juniors Lou Lezzi and Trent McClosky.

Although Siegle will have to build the program in his likeness from the bottom up, he has the opportunity to hold honest open competitions and let the best players compete for the wide array of positions.

“We have a good senior class and some guys have experience,” Siegle said. “Some guys don't have that experience, but our effort will take a back seat to nobody. The kids have done a great job so far; they punch the clock and get to work when they get here.”

Siegle expects his players to show enthusiasm and play with a high motor in order to compete.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.