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Prospect watch: Mack Leftwich

| Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
Christopher Horner
North Allegheny quarterback Mack Leftwich scores a touchdown against Central Dauphin during the first half of their PIAA Class AAAA state semifinal Saturday December 10, 2011 at Mansion Park in Altoona. (Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review)

MACK LEFTWICH

5-foot-10, 185 pounds, QB, North Allegheny

North Allegheny coach Art Walker has warned college coaches to measure Mack Leftwich by his football acumen, accuracy or arm strength. In other words, anything other than his height.

Which, by the way, is a shade shorter than 6 feet.

“I've tried to tell everybody I talk to that whoever gets him will be extremely happy,” Walker said. “Don't get hung up on the height because it doesn't matter. He's going to get it done with his leadership skills, mental skills and competitiveness. Those are things you can't measure.”

As a junior at North Allegheny, Leftwich completed 130 of 230 passes for 2,223 yards and 20 touchdowns and led the Tigers in rushing with 933 yards and 16 touchdowns on 148 carries. After going to a camp while visiting relatives in Texas this summer, Leftwich found a school willing to overlook his frame.

“No doubt, it's been a struggle in the recruiting process,” Leftwich said. “My height has been the biggest concern in my recruiting. I've had tons of D-I coaches say, ‘I love your tape. How tall are you?' When you say, ‘I'm 5-10, they don't seem as interested anymore.' But I knew that coming in. I like to think the reason I'm only getting I-AA looks is because of that. I'm glad at least someone is giving me a chance. ”

That would be Stephen F. Austin University, a Division I-AA program in Nacogdoches, which became the first school to offer a scholarship to Leftwich. He also is attracting interest from Central Arkansas, Northwestern State, Sam Houston State and Villanova.

“I was definitely pretty excited,” said Leftwich, who has no plans to walk on at Arizona, where his father, Spencer, is tight ends coach. “It was a relief knowing that going into my senior season I have an offer. I can focus on winning games, not being perfect. Especially since I got this scholarship offer, I'll get to be on my own in college. No one wants to live at home for college.”

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