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North Huntingdon C.S. Kim school and instructor shine

| Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012, 9:01 p.m.
Students and instructors from the C.S. Kim Karate school in North Huntingdon who traveled to the International Tang Soo Do Federation's World Championships pose with trophies and medals won at the event in Chicago. Submitted

Summer has been a busy time at the North Huntingdon C.S. Kim Karate school.

The location's head instructor, Liz Lindsay, was one of the top medal winners at the International Tang Soo Do Federation's World Championship in Chicago, and the North Huntingdon school nearly tripled its usual fundraising total from its annual Kick-a-Thon, which were just two of the school's major highlights over the last two months.

Lindsay, 27, competed as a third-degree black belt at the world championships and came out with the Grand Champion title in three competitions — singles forms, team forms and women's singles sparring — at the biennial competition held July 26 to 29 in the Windy City.

It was the second time she had won the two forms titles, as she previously earned gold at the 2010 championships. In all, competitors from the C.S. Kim locations around the Pittsburgh area brought home a total of 16 gold, four silver and four bronze medals against competition from across the U.S. and more than a dozen other countries.

“Two years ago, I had won forms for the first time, and it really didn't sink in until after I came home. It took a lot of practice, and it's a big rush when you're competing,” Lindsay said. “This world championship was special because (as the defending champ) a lot of people were rooting for me, but a lot of people were on the other side trying to beat me.”

Almost 100 competitors from the Pittsburgh area attended the championships, as their proximity to the city allowed many students, some as young as 5 years old, to be in Chicago. The next world championship will be held in Portugal in 2014.

This world championship was a special one for Lindsay, as it was her last before she will take on the title of Master. She tested to receive her fourth-degree black belt, which she will earn in October, while another C.S. Kim instructor, Master Bill Copeland, will soon receive his fifth-degree black belt.

“Because I'm already an instructor, not a lot changes,” Lindsay said. “The biggest difference is how people look at you. When you have that belt with the red line through it, people really look to you to set an example in teaching and discipline.”

Lindsay's North Huntingdon students shined on Aug. 14, when they hosted their Kick-a-Thon, an annual event held at C.S. Kim schools to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Students kicked targets, broke boards and completed other skilled tasks while sponsors backed the participants' performance. While the goal of the school was to hit four figures in money raised, it blew well past that number to the tune of $2,940 that was donated to the MDA.

“Most of the time our schools gets right around $1,000, so to nearly triple that, it made me very proud,” Lindsay said. “You see a lot of negative things in the news, so I was glad to see our kids haven't forgotten how to do something to help others.”

Matt Grubba is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-388-5830 or mgrubba@tribweb.com.

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