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Trib HS Insider Q&A: Freeport's Brendan Lynch

| Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
Valley News Dispatch
Freeport's Brendan Lynch (No. 3) is pressured by Valley's Colten Buzzard (No. 45) during a game on Sept. 21, 2012, at Valley Memorial Stadium in New Kensington. Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch

Freeport's third-year starter, Brendan Lynch, has developed into one of the Alle-Kiski Valley's top dual-threat quarterbacks.

Apply pressure to the pocket, and he'll take off. Let him roam on third down, and he'll beat you with a zinger downfield.

But Lynch admits he's had help. And he's proof that Freeport signal-callers — past and present — have formed a fraternity.

He gives credit to two former Freeport quarterbacks — head coach John Gaillot and Alex Isenberg, who guided the Yellowjackets to their 500th win in 2009 — for his success under center.

Q: How have you seen yourself develop as a quarterback?

A: You learn a lot from experience. The key was just playing. My first year I didn't know what to expect. I surprised myself with some success. But I had great players around me. I developed toughness and self-confidence. Last year, I developed my leadership more. I wasn't doing as much running and passing. I was more of a facilitator.

Q: Do you see yourself as a dual-threat QB?

A: I've always been a fast runner. I feel I have good running skills — seeing the holes and making the cuts. But passing has been more difficult for me. Coach Gaillot worked with me a lot, and Alex Isenberg mentored me with the fundamentals.

Q: The team was upset, 9-8, by Valley in Week 4. How tough was that to take?

A: I think it was a wake-up-call game. Now everybody has a sense of urgency. We know we have to show up every week. We're not untouchable. Some people on the team didn't approach that game like they usually do.

Q: So, you also see yourself as a motivational speaker?

A: Yes. A lot of people come to me with problems or for advice, and I talk with them. I like to help people out and give them optimism. I was taught to be a leader. Younger kids look up to you, and you need to set that example.

Q: Freeport has quite a presence on Twitter. Thanks to you?

A: I am one of the founders of Freeport Twitter. I love to see what's going on on there. Sometimes I am on there too much, and my parents get on me about it.

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