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Springdale boys win fifth straight Section 2-A title

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Bill Shirley | For The Valley News Dispatch
Riverview's Zach Aber (left) and Springdale's Jared Cole battle for the ball during on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012.
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By George Guido
Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012, 9:56 p.m.
 

The Springdale Dynamos wrapped up a fifth consecutive Section 2-A boys soccer title Thursday afternoon with a 2-0 shutout at Riverview.

A first-half goal by Jared Cole off Charlie Guy's steal and a second-half goal by Will Noble was all the Dynamos needed.

Springdale finished the Section 2-A campaign with a 9-1 record and is 12-3 overall. Riverview, coming off an upset win over Vincentian on Tuesday, finished 7-3 in section play and 11-6 overall.

Both teams have qualified for the WPIAL playoffs, set to begin Thursday.

The Dynamos defense allowed Riverview few scoring opportunities.

“The key to the game today was we didn't need a win, we needed a tie,” Springdale coach Cesareo Sanchez said. “But we played to win; the plan was to keep pressure, to play the game on their half of the field. No dribbling the ball, send it to a player.”

“We went on that stretch where we won seven straight games, and that Vincentian game Tuesday might have taken a little energy out of us,” Raiders coach Mickey Namey said.

“We're a thin team, so my entire starting 11 usually plays most of the game.”

Riverview did, however, have an early chance. Cole Quinio's penalty kick three minutes into the action didn't reach the goal as Springdale served notice that its defense would be at the top of its game on this night.

Riverview's Tyler Murphy turned away two Cole opportunities in the first half while Raiders defenseman Billy Futules took possession of what looked to be an open area near the goal for Jacob Cotter.

“Tyler's a burner,” Namey said. “We'd like to put him at forward where we need him, but no one, defensively, can outrun him. So the question is, do we want to attack or defend with him.”

The Dynamos broke through when Guy's pass after a steal resulted in a Cole breakaway and 1-0 lead.

Springdale added an insurance goal with 13:30 left when Noble outmaneuvered Raiders goalkeeper Sam Gonsowski just outside the goal box and scored into an open net. The Dynamos defense finished the job.

“We can have trouble with corner kicks, but our goalkeeper, Joey Wysocki, is a star,” Sanchez said.

“Kudos to Riverview and Vincentian, and I think all of us are going to be strong in the playoffs.”

George Guido is a freelance writer.

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