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Trib HS Insider Q&A: Jeannette's Jordan Edmunds

| Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012, 11:02 p.m.
Tribune-Review
Jeannette running back Jordan Edmunds eludes Washington's Chase Caldwell during their WPIAL Class AA Interstate Conference game at Washington High School on September 28, 2012. Washington defeated Jeannette 18-15. Barry Reeger | Tribune-Review

It had been tough sledding for Jeannette standout Jordan Edmunds in recent weeks. The senior fullback/linebacker, who is gaining interest from various Division I FCS schools, wasn't gaining much ground on offense.

Yet, except for a three-point setback to No. 3 Washington, the fourth-ranked Jayhawks (6-1, 5-1 Interstate Conference) kept on winning.

Through six games, the 5-foot-10, 195-pound Edmunds had gained just 430 yards rushing. That changed Saturday afternoon, when Edmunds broke free for 161 yards and four touchdowns to lead Jeannette to a hard-fought 31-26 Class AA nonconference victory at Shady Side Academy.

Q: The win over Shady Side Academy was a see-saw affair that was decided by your fourth and final touchdown of the day. How does a performance like that make you feel?

A: It gives you confidence and helps you going into the next week. We didn't play our best game, but the bottom line is we won the game. That's all that matters.

Q: Where do you like to play best, on offense or defense?

A: I'd say defense. I enjoy making the hits instead of getting hit.

Q: Who's your favorite athlete?

A: It's probably (former Jeannette star) Terrelle Pryor because he's from here. Just to see him play here and in college and to make it to the NFL, it's nice to see someone who came from your town make it.

Q: What have you been able to glean from some of the high-profile players at Jeannette who have gone on to Division I schools — guys like Pryor, Jordan Hall, Devonte Shannon and Demetrious Cox.

A: I picked up a lot from “Dede” (Cox). I picked up on his work ethic and how much he trained, and I really admired his leadership and how hard he worked to be a D-I recruit.

Q: What advice would you give to young football players at Jeannette, who are coming up through the system?

A: Probably to listen to the coaches. I mean a lot of times in my four years here, guys can be boneheads and not pay attention. They take plays off. And then, the coaches preach on it every day. They say, “Don't take plays off. Don't quit.” People don't pay attention. Once you get in big games and take plays off, that can change the momentum of the game.

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