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High-scoring Quaker Valley girls soccer team fueled by deep roster

| Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Kristina Serafini | Sewickley Herald
Quaker Valley's Greer Monahan runs with the ball against Keystone Oaks on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, at Dormont Memorial Stadium.
Kristina Serafini | Sewickley Herald
Quaker Valley's Isabella Brown battles a Keystone Oaks player for the ball during a game Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, at Dormont Memorial Stadium.

Three players have helped each other score most of the goals so far this season for the undefeated Quaker Valley girls soccer team, which entered the week 13-0 overall and 9-0 in Section 5-AA.

Senior Greer Monahan (26 goals), sophomore Moriah Wigley (16) and junior Megan Amoroso (12) have been quite good in setting up plays for one another, coach Mike Pastor said.

“One of our strengths as a team is that we have a lot of girls who are capable of scoring goals in big games,” Pastor said. “The thing that really makes our team strong is that the girls play hard for one another.

“Nobody on the team is a ‘me' first kind of kid.”

The Quakers have outscored opponents 67-10. In eight games, they have scored at least five goals, including one in which they scored nine and two in which they scored eight.

The least they've scored have been two.

“We're playing with a lot of finesse,” said Monahan, 17. “Megan has been really good in setting me up.”

Amoroso, 16, agreed she and Monahan have fine chemistry.

“We've been playing together so long, we know what works,” Amoroso said. “I can give her a ball and she can give (it to me), knowing we'll make something out of it.”

Amoroso said Wigley has been a strong addition to the mix.

“(Wigley) is capable of a lot of speed,” Amoroso said. “Her shooting is really good.

“We'll get the ball to her on the outside and she'll get the ball to us on the inside.”

Led by junior goalkeeper Molly Harkins, who has five shutouts, the team's defense has been a pleasant surprise.

“Our goalie and (some other) players graduated,” said Wigley, 15. “I'm a little surprised we're doing so well (so quickly).”

Wigley said beating Moon, 2-1, last month gave the Quakers a large amount of confidence.

The two teams meet again Saturday at Moon.

Amoroso thinks the turning point came earlier, in a nonsection win over archival Sewickley Academy.

“There's a lot of emotion in that game,” Amoroso said. “Beating Sewickley Academy gave us the confidence to beat Moon.”

Pastor worries the Quakers might be a target.

“Although (our records are) something we are proud of, we are focused on improving as a team so we are able to play our best soccer in the playoffs,” Pastor said. “We still have five games left in the regular season and know that other teams are going to play their best games against us.”

Last year, Quaker Valley was eliminated by eventual champion Mars in the quarterfinals of the WPIAL tournament.

Karen Kadilak is a freelance writer.

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