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MLB

Giants to retire Barry Bonds' No. 25 before game vs. Pirates

Matt Rosenberg
| Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, 1:15 p.m.
Barry Bonds left the Pirates after the 1992 season to sign with the San Francisco Giants.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barry Bonds left the Pirates after the 1992 season to sign with the San Francisco Giants.
Former Pirates and Giants outfielder Barry Bonds is honored in 2007 at PNC Park.
Former Pirates and Giants outfielder Barry Bonds is honored in 2007 at PNC Park.
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007, file photo,  San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds hits his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. The U.S. Department of Justice formally dropped its criminal prosecution of Barry Bonds, Major League Baseball's career home run leader. The decade-long investigation and prosecution of Bonds for obstruction of justice ended quietly Tuesday morning, July 21, 2015, when the DOJ said it would not challenge the reversal of his felony conviction to the U.S. Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007, file photo, San Francisco Giants Barry Bonds hits his 756th career home run in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Washington Nationals in San Francisco. The U.S. Department of Justice formally dropped its criminal prosecution of Barry Bonds, Major League Baseball's career home run leader. The decade-long investigation and prosecution of Bonds for obstruction of justice ended quietly Tuesday morning, July 21, 2015, when the DOJ said it would not challenge the reversal of his felony conviction to the U.S. Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

In their 60th anniversary season, the San Francisco Giants will make a special day for No. 25.

Would-be-hall-of-famer-if-not-for-steroid-implications slugger Barry Bonds will have his number retired by the Giants on Aug. 11 at AT&T Park against — you might have guessed it — the Pirates.

In seven seasons with the Pirates from 1986-92, Bonds hit .275 with 176 home runs, 556 RBIs and an .883 OPS.

He was the National League MVP in 1990 and 1992 with the Pirates and won three Gold Gloves in leading the team to three consecutive National League Championship Series.

The five-time MVP with the Giants is the MLB record-holder with 762 home runs, 2,558 walks and 688 intentional walks.

He won four-consecutive MVP awards from 2001-2004.

Because of his implications with steroid usage, Bonds has not yet received enough votes to make the hall of fame. This year, he received 53.8 percent of votes, well short of the 75 percent needed to make the hall.

But his stock rose two consecutive years after a few years of spinning its wheels. He received 44.3 percent of the votes in 2016. In his first year of eligibility in 2013, He got just 36.2 percent.

"No other Giants player has worn No. 25 since Barry's final season," Giants president and CEO Laurence M. Baer said. "It's time to officially retire his number in honor of his remarkable 22-year career as one of the greatest players of all time and for his countless achievements and contributions as a Giant. Barry grew up with the Giants and followed in the footsteps of his Godfather Willie Mays and another Giant legend who also wore number 25 -- his late father, Bobby. By officially retiring No. 25, we will not only pay tribute to Barry as the greatest player of his generation, but also honor the legacy of two of the greatest players to ever wear a Giants uniform."

Bonds is currently a special advisor with the Giants.

"I'm both honored and humbled that the Giants are going to retire my number this season," Bonds said. "As I've always said, the Giants and Giants fans are a part of my family."

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