ShareThis Page
MLB

Yankees, Red Sox fight at Fenway after Tyler Austin hit

| Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 11:24 p.m.
New York Yankees' Tyler Austin, center, rushes Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly after being hit by a pitch during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. At left holding back Austin is Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez.
Associated Press
New York Yankees' Tyler Austin, center, rushes Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly after being hit by a pitch during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. At left holding back Austin is Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez.
Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly, left, knocks down New York Yankees' Tyler Austin as they fight during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. At right is Red Sox first baseman Mitch Moreland.
Associated Press
Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly, left, knocks down New York Yankees' Tyler Austin as they fight during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. At right is Red Sox first baseman Mitch Moreland.
New York Yankees right fielder Aaron Judge puts Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly in a headlock after Kelly hit Yankees' Tyler Austin with a pitch during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018.
Associated Press
New York Yankees right fielder Aaron Judge puts Boston Red Sox relief pitcher Joe Kelly in a headlock after Kelly hit Yankees' Tyler Austin with a pitch during the seventh inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Wednesday, April 11, 2018.

BOSTON — New York Yankees designated hitter Tyler Austin rushed the mound after being hit by a pitch from Boston Red Sox reliever Joe Kelly, and both players began punching away in a bench-clearing brawl Wednesday night at Fenway Park.

The bitter rivals tangled in the seventh inning, adding another chapter to a long history that has included some memorable brawls.

The benches cleared briefly in the third after Austin's spikes clipped Brock Holt's leg on a slide into second base. Holt took issue with the contact and they exchanged words before being separated.

Then with the Yankees leading 10-6, Kelly nearly hit Austin and then caught him on the side with a 2-1 pitch clocked at 98 mph. Austin slammed his bat on the plate, threw it down and took four steps toward the mound while hollering. Kelly waved Austin at him, and things quickly escalated.

The scuffle spilled across the field before it broke up in front of the Boston dugout on the first base side, with Yankees sluggers Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton pushing the pile. Yankees hitting coach Marcus Thames used both hands to shove Austin all the way across the infield toward the New York dugout.

Austin, Kelly and Yankees third base coach Phil Nevin were ejected.

It was the second bench-clearing brawl of the day in the majors. Colorado star Nolan Arenado charged the mound after being a pitch from San Diego's Luis Perdomo threw a pitch behind him.

New York and Boston have a history of furious fights.

Thurman Munson collided with catcher Carlton Fisk in 1973 after Gene Michael missed a bunt attempt. Three years later, Lou Piniella bowled into Fisk at the plate, and Red Sox pitcher Bill Lee separated a shoulder in the ensuing fighting.

After Roger Clemens threw a pitch under Manny Ramirez's chin during the 2003 AL Championship Series, Yankees bench coach Don Zimmer charged Pedro Martinez, who hit Karim Garcia with a pitch earlier. Martinez picked up Zimmer and threw him to the ground.

A year later, Boston's Bronson Arroyo hit Alex Rodriguez with a pitch, A-Rod shouted at the pitcher, and Red Sox catcher Jason Varitek punched Rodriguez in the face, setting off a scuffle.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me