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MLB Notebook: Former baseball union chief Miller dies

| Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012, 9:12 p.m.

NEW YORK — Marvin Miller, the soft-spoken union head who led baseball players in a series of strikes and legal battles that won free agency, revolutionized sports and turned athletes into multimillionaires, died Tuesday. He was 95.

Miller died at his home in Manhattan at 5:30 a.m., said his daughter Susan Miller. He had been diagnosed with liver cancer in August.

In his 16 years as executive director of the Major League Players Association, starting in 1966, Miller fought owners on many fronts, winning free agency for players in December 1975. He may best be remembered, however, as the man who made the word “strike” stand for something other than a pitched ball.

Miller, who retired and became a consultant to the union in 1982, led the first walkout in the game's history 10 years earlier. On April 5, 1972, signs posted at major league parks simply said: “No Game Today.” The strike, which lasted 13 days, was followed by a walkout during spring training in 1976 and a midseason job action that darkened the stadiums for seven weeks in 1981.

Bonds, Clemens, Sosa set to appear on Hall ballot

Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa are set to appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time, and fans will soon find out whether drug allegations can block the former stars from reaching baseball's shrine.

The ballot will be officially announced Wednesday.

Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza and Curt Schilling are certain to be among the other first-time eligible players.

Phils' All-Star Ruiz suspended 25 games

Philadelphia Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz was suspended for the first 25 games of next season following a positive test for an amphetamine.

The 33-year-old was an All-Star for the first time this year when he hit .325 with 16 homers and 68 RBI.

Source: Yankees, Pettitte close in on deal

Andy Pettitte and the New York Yankees are nearing agreement on a one-year contract in the range of $10 million to $12 million, a person familiar with the negotiations said Tuesday.

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