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MLB notebook: Mets reward Wright with richest contract in franchise history

| Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, 7:20 p.m.

The face of the New York Mets plans to stick around for quite a while.

All-Star third baseman David Wright and the Mets agreed Friday to a $138 million, eight-year contract, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press.

The deal, the richest in franchise history, replaces Wright's $16 million salary for next season and includes $122 million in new money, the person said, speaking on condition of anonymity because the agreement was not yet final.

Wright is the club's career leader in hits, RBI, runs and walks.

• All-time saves leader Mariano Rivera and the New York Yankees have finalized their $10 million, one-year contract. After missing most of the season because of a knee injury, Rivera accepted a cut in guaranteed money from his $30 million, two-year deal that had covered the last two years. Rivera, who turned 43 on Thursday, can earn an additional $500,000 if he is MVP of the league championship series, $1 million if he is MVP of the World Series and $1 million if he wins the Rolaids Relief Award.

• The Braves traded Tommy Hanson to the Angels for former closer Jordan Walden on Friday. Hanson has seen a decrease in his velocity as he battled rotator cuff tendinitis in 2011 and a lower back strain in 2012. Walden had 32 saves in 2011 then lost his closer's role to Ernesto Frieri.

• A person familiar with the situation said testosterone is what caused Manny Ramirez to test positive for a banned substance last year. The administrator of baseball's drug program issued his annual report Friday. The document lists the substances that resulted in seven positive tests for performance-enhancing drugs that led to discipline.

• The Royals and second baseman Chris Getz agreed a $1.05 million, one-year contract.

• Former major leaguer Chan Ho Park is retiring after a career spanning nearly two decades in the United States, Japan and South Korea. The 39-year-old right-hander announced his retirement Friday. Park holds the MLB record for most wins by an Asian pitcher, going 124-98 with a 4.36 ERA. In his 17-year career, he played for the Dodgers, Rangers, Padres, Mets, Phillies, Yankees and Pirates.

— AP

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