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MLB

MLB notebook: Rise in salaries steepest since 2007

| Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, 7:44 p.m.

Baseball's average salary increased 3.8 percent this year to a record $3.2 million.

According to final figures released Friday by the Major League Baseball Players Association, the rise was the steepest since 2007. The boost was helped by an increase in the minimum salary from $414,000 to $480,000.

The Pirates' average salary went up from 27th out of 30 teams to 19th at $2.47 million.

The Yankees had the highest average for the 14th consecutive season at $6.88 million, rising after consecutive declines from a peak of $7.66 million when they won the World Series in 2009.

The Dodgers boosted their average from 13th to second at $5.55 million, followed by the Angels ($5.48 million) and the American League champion Tigers ($4.95 million). The Rangers went up from 15th to fifth at $4.89 million.

At $684,940, the Astros had the lowest average since the 2006 Marlins at $594,722.

The Red Sox and Cubs had their lowest averages since at least 2000. Boston dropped from third to 12th at $3.3 million, and Chicago seventh to 23rd at $2.1 million.

The World Series champion Giants remained eighth, averaging $4.07 million.

Figures are based on Aug. 31 rosters and disabled lists, with 944 players averaging $3,213,479.

McCarthy agrees with Diamondbacks

Right-hander Brandon McCarthy reached agreement with the Diamondbacks on a $15.5 million, two-year contract, a person with knowledge of the negotiations said.

The deal was pending a physical, which will be especially important. McCarthy, the Athletics' Opening Day starter last season, was hit in the right side of the head by a line drive off the bat of the Angels' Erick Aybar on Sept. 5. The 29-year-old pitcher sustained an epidural hemorrhage, brain contusion and skull fracture, then underwent a two-hour surgery.

Last month, McCarthy spent two days undergoing extensive evaluations by renowned concussion expert Dr. Michael Collins at UPMC. He was cleared by Collins to begin working out and resuming his regular offseason routine.

Oakland's medical staff initially warned that McCarthy's situation was “life-threatening.”

McCarthy went 8-6 with a 3.24 ERA this year in his sixth big league season and second with the A's. He was 9-9 with a 3.32 ERA in 2011.

Around the league

The Cubs finalized a $9.5 million, two-year contract with Japanese pitcher Kyuji Fujikawa. ... Reliever Randy Choate and the Cardinals finalized a $7.5 million, three-year contract. ... Right-hander Dan Haren agreed to a one-year contract with the Nationals. ... Speedy outfielder Brett Gardner and the Yankees agreed to a $2.85 million, one-year contract that avoids salary arbitration. ... The Red Sox obtained right-hander Graham Godfrey from the Athletics, completing a trade for right-hander Sandy Rosario. ... The Blue Jays plan to honor former slugger Carlos Delgado next year by adding his name to the club's Level of Excellence.

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