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MLB notebook: Baseball to expand blood testing for HGH

| Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, 4:58 p.m.

PARADISE VALLEY, Ariz. — Major League Baseball will test for human growth hormone throughout the regular season and increase efforts to detect abnormal levels of testosterone.

Players were subject to blood testing for HGH during spring training last year, and Thursday's agreement between management and the players' association expands that throughout the season.

The announcement came one day after steroid-tainted stars Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa failed to gain election to the Hall of Fame in their first year of eligibility.

Banned hit king Rose preaches patience to tarnished stars

Although Pete Rose wasn't surprised when no players got a call from the Hall of Fame this week, baseball's career hits leader hopes to provide a few lessons in patience to the rest of his sport's tarnished superstars.

The 71-year-old Rose said he's “a little sad” nobody was elected to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday. He also says anything that artificially alters the game's statistics shouldn't be praised or honored.

Hall of Famers happy to see Bonds, Clemens denied

Hall of Famers Goose Gossage, Al Kaline, Dennis Eckersley and others are in no rush to open the door to Cooperstown for anyone linked to steroids.

“If they let these guys in ever — at any point — it's a big black eye for the Hall and for baseball,” Gossage said. “It's like telling our kids you can cheat, you can do whatever you want, and it's not going to matter.”

Biggio says ‘unfair' to link him to steroids era

Craig Biggio thinks he might have been bypassed for the Hall of Fame because he was on the ballot for the first time with several big stars linked to performance-enhancing drugs.

Biggio received the highest vote total in a year that produced no electees to Cooperstown. Biggio, 20th on the career list with 3,060 hits, appeared on 68.2 percent of the 569 ballots — 39 votes shy.

“I think it's kind of unfair, but it's the reality of the era that we played in,” he said. “Obviously some guys are guilty and others aren't, and it's painful for the ones that weren't.”

Around the league

Former Pirates right-hander Chris Resop agreed to a $1.35 million, one-year contract with the Athletics. ... Paul Dolan was approved by MLB as the controlling owner of the Indians.

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