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MLB notebook: Granderson out 10 weeks with broken arm

| Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013, 6:24 p.m.
The Yankees' Curtis Granderson breaks his right forearm after being hit by a pitch from the Blue Jays' J.A. Happ during the first inning Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013, in Tampa, Fla. (AP)

New York Yankees outfielder Curtis Granderson is expected to be out until May after breaking his right forearm.

The slugger was hit by a pitch from Toronto's J.A. Happ in the bottom of the first inning Sunday, his first at-bat of spring training. The Yankees, who lost, 2-0, to a Toronto Blue Jays' split-squad, first called it a bruise, but X-rays revealed the break.

“Five pitches in, we got a little setback,” said Granderson, who was wearing a molded brace. “Now we rest, recover, get it back, and get ready to play whenever that day comes.”

The team said Granderson could be out 10 weeks, which means he'll miss about a month of the regular season.

Granderson led New York with 43 homers last season.

Jeter nearing return

Yankees captain Derek Jeter is about two weeks away from playing in a game for the first time since breaking his ankle last fall.

New York general manager Brian Cashman said the shortstop should be ready to play in spring training games around March 10.

“Physically, he's capable of doing everything,” Cashman said. “We're being very cautious.”

Also, closer Mariano Rivera threw 20 pitches in a batting practice session, his first activity against live hitters since undergoing reconstructive knee surgery in May.

Garza feeling better

Matt Garza still had a bulky wrap around his midsection Sunday, and the Cubs right-hander was uncertain when he would be allowed to throw again.

A week after feeling a twinge in his left side while throwing batting practice, Garza said he had no pain and was feeling better. He described the pulled muscle as “just a little spot that's annoying.”

“This is just a slower process because it's more important due to the fact that it's required to use in everything,” Garza said. “It's just more like something's still there, and you don't want anything to be there because you don't want to reaggravate it and get it worse.”

Mets reliever restricted

Mets reliever Pedro Feliciano will be restricted from baseball activity for at least two weeks while wearing a heart monitor.

General manager Sandy Alderson said it was not clear if Feliciano has a “hole” in his heart, which is what the left-hander said Saturday.

The 36-year-old Feliciano has not pitched since 2010.

Sock sells for $92K

A bloody sock worn by Curt Schilling while pitching for the Boston Red Sox in Game 2 of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals sold for $92,613 at a live auction Saturday night at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion.

Schilling had loaned his sock to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Museum, but when his Rhode Island-based video game company “38 Studios” went bankrupt, he decided to sell the sock that was bloodied as he pitched on an injured ankle.

Bidding began at $25,000 several weeks ago.

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