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MLB notebook: Canada, Mexico brawl in WBC

| Saturday, March 9, 2013, 9:21 p.m.

PHOENIX — A fierce brawl that saw Alfredo Aceves and several players throw nasty punches erupted Saturday in the ninth inning of Canada's 10-3 romp over Mexico in the World Baseball Classic in a melee that also involved fans.

Multiple fights broke out after Canada's Rene Tosoni was hit in the back by a pitch from Arnold Leon with the score 9-3 at Chase Field, home of the Arizona Diamondbacks. It quickly turned into a wild scene, as chaotic as any on a major league field in recent years.

Even when the fisticuffs ended, Canadian pitching coach Denis Boucher was hit in the face by a full water bottle thrown from the crowd. Canada shortstop Cale Iorg angrily threw the bottle back into the crowd.

Several police officers came onto the field trying to restore order, and there were a few skirmishes in the decidedly pro-Mexico crowd of 19,581. Seven players were ejected after umpires huddled, trying to sort out the frenzy.

There had already been several borderline plays on the bases when things got out of hand. A bunt single by Chris Robinson heightened the tension — a WBC tiebreaker relies heavily on runs and the Canadians wanted to score. Third baseman Luis Cruz fielded Robinson's bunt and seemed to tell Leon to hit a batter.

Rivera announces he'll retire after 2013

Saying he made the decision before arriving at spring training, Mariano Rivera announced Saturday that he will retire at the end of the season and hopes to cap his record-setting career by winning another World Series with the New York Yankees.

Rivera was surrounded by family and teammates when he made the announcement during a news conference at the team's spring training complex.

The 43-year-old has a clear vision of how he wants his career to end.

“The last game I hope will be throwing the last pitch in the World Series,” he said. “”Winning the World Series, that would be my ambition.”

Rivera holds the career saves record with 608 and has helped the Yankees win five World Series titles. He is regarded as the greatest closer of all time, whether he's throwing his cut fastball in the regular season or postseason.

Jeter singles in return

Yankees captain Derek Jeter singled sharply to left field on his first pitch since breaking an ankle last fall in the AL championship series.

Jeter missed New York's first 13 spring training games and was the Yankees' designated hitter and leadoff batter Saturday against Atlanta. Jeter received a partial standing ovation from the crowd at Steinbrenner Field in the first inning, then singled between shortstop and third base against left-hander Mike Minor.

Dominican Republic defeats Spain

Carlos Santana homered, Robinson Cano had three hits and the Dominican Republic beat Spain 6-3 at the World Baseball Classic.

Santana and Nelson Cruz each drove in two runs for the Dominican Republic. Edwin Encarnacion scored twice.

Puerto Rico wins

Mike Aviles drove in three runs, and Luis Figueroa had a pinch-hit, two-run double in the eighth to lift Puerto Rico over Venezuela, 6-3, in the World Baseball Classic.

Aviles had a two-run single in the fourth and also drove in a run in the eighth.

No pain for Danks

John Danks' second rehab start may not have been as good as the first, but it was pain-free.

“I felt good,” he said after allowing five hits and three earned runs in 3 13 innings against the Diamondbacks. “It's still a work in progress. I wasn't throwing as hard as I anticipate when it's all said and done. But I threw all four pitches. There weren't any restraints.”

Danks, who had offseason shoulder surgery and hasn't pitched in a regular game since last May, walked two batters and threw a wild pitch and reached his pitch count about an inning earlier than hoped.

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