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MLB notebook: Cubs owner threatens to move team from Wrigley

| Wednesday, May 1, 2013, 8:06 p.m.

• Cubs owner Tom Ricketts publicly threatened for the first time Wednesday to move the team out of Wrigley Field if his plans for a big, new video screen are blocked, saying he needs millions of dollars in ad revenue to help bankroll the renovation of the storied ballpark. Ricketts until now had said nothing as dire, despite months of contentious negotiations over how to keep everyone happy in sprucing up the 99-year-old stadium on Chicago's North Side.

• Nationals pitcher Stephen Strasburg is expected to make his next scheduled start Saturday against the Pirates after experiencing no pain during a bullpen session in Atlanta. Strasburg had some discomfort in his right arm during a start Monday against the Braves.

• The White Sox recalled right-hander and former Blackhawk starBrian Omogrosso from Triple-A Charlotte.

• Rangers left-hander Matt Harrison had a setback in his recovery, needing another operation eight days after surgery to repair a herniated disk in his lower back.

• Blue Jays knuckleballer R.A. Dickey was diagnosed with mild inflammation in his neck and back following an MRI and will get an extra day of rest before his next start.

• The Tigers put left-hander Phil Coke on the 15-day disabled list and sent right-handed reliever Bruce Rondon to Triple-A Toledo.

• The Athletics put outfielder Coco Crisp and left-hander Brett Anderson on the 15-day DL.

—AP

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