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MLB

MLB game times vary widely by ballpark

| Saturday, June 22, 2013, 7:42 p.m.

Going to a baseball game in Seattle? Expect to see fewer pitches, fewer runs and a faster finish. Your tickets are for Fenway Park or Yankee Stadium? Make those dinner plans for a little later.

The average time of a major league game varies considerably from ballpark to ballpark, with one common thread: Scoring runs is entertaining, but it takes time. And with so many hitter-friendly parks around, those quick games have become an anomaly in some cities.

Not that everyone minds.

“I mean, if I am going to a ballgame — or at least when I used to go to ballgames as a kid — the longer the game was, the happier I was,” Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon said.

Whether young or old, no fans spend more time at a ballpark than those in Boston. Over the past five years, the average time of a nine-inning game at Fenway Park is 3 hours, 8 minutes, the longest in the majors, according to STATS LLC.

Yankee Stadium is second at 3 hours, 5 minutes, followed by Miller Park and Coors Field at 3 hours even.

Fans at Safeco Field don't sit in their seats as long. Nine-inning games there average 2 hours, 44 minutes. That's a 24-minute difference from top to bottom.

PNC Park ranks in the middle of the pack at 2 hours, 52 minutes per nine-inning game.

A nine-inning game in the major leagues this season is taking 2 hours, 58 minutes, which would be among the highest averages if it holds for the season. Game times have been creeping up for years — nine innings took an average of 2 hours, 45 minutes in 1988, for instance.

There's a correlation with offense.

The top four ballparks for runs scored since 2009 are among the top seven for length of game.

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