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MLB

Cardinals finally find some offense, beat Dodgers, 4-2

| Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013, 11:45 p.m.

LOS ANGELES — Matt Holliday and pinch-hitter Shane Robinson connected for the first home runs of the NL Championship Series, and the Cardinals beat the Dodgers, 4-2, on Tuesday night to take a 3-1 lead in their best-of-seven matchup.

In a series starved for offense, the Cardinals scored as many runs as they did in the first three games combined.

Hitless in his previous 22 at-bats at Dodger Stadium, Holliday sent a two-run shot off Ricky Nolasco an estimated 426 feet into left field, capping a three-run third that gave the Cardinals a 3-0 lead.

Game 5 is Wednesday afternoon at Dodger Stadium, with the Cardinals one win from the World Series. Zack Greinke is set to start for the Dodgers against Joe Kelly.

Matt Carpenter had an RBI double in the third that scored David Descalso, who hit a leadoff single. Carpenter came around on Holliday's homer after there were none in the first three games for the first time in NLCS history.

Dodgers shortstop Hanley Ramirez, playing with a broken left rib, left in the middle of the sixth after striking out three times.

Cardinals third baseman David Freese came out after six innings. He left Monday's game with a cramp in his right calf.

Carlos Martinez pitched two scoreless innings in relief of winner Lance Lynn. Trevor Rosenthal got three outs for the save.

After a leadoff single by Andre Ethier in the ninth, rookie Yasiel Puig grounded into a double play.

Robinson's home run bounced off the top of the wall in left field on a 1-0 pitch from J.P. Howell with one out in the seventh, extending the Cardinals' lead to 4-2.

Lynn allowed two runs and six hits in 5 13 innings. The right-hander lost his only other start this postseason, giving up five runs over 4 13 innings in Game 2 of the NLDS against Pittsburgh.

The Dodgers were down 4-2 in the seventh when Nick Punto doubled with one out. Martinez, however, picked off Punto before throwing another pitch and then retired Carl Crawford on an inning-ending groundout.

Trailing 3-2, the Dodgers got the potential tying run on base with one out in the sixth when Puig singled up the middle to chase Lynn. Juan Uribe grounded into a double play against Seth Maness to end the inning.

Nolasco allowed three runs and three hits in four innings. He struck out four and walked one.

Los Angeles scored twice in the fourth to cut it to 3-2. Adrian Gonzalez hit a leadoff double and scored on Puig's single. A.J. Ellis singled to drive in Andre Ethier, who walked.

But just when it appeared the Dodgers had grabbed the momentum, pinch-hitter Skip Schumaker bounced into an inning-ending double play.

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