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MLB

Red Sox trounce sloppy Cardinals, 8-1, in Game 1 of World Series

| Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, 11:54 p.m.
The Red Sox's Dustin Pedroia yells at David Ortiz (34) as they scored on a double by Mike Napoli during the first inning against the Cardinals in Game 1 of the World Series on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Boston.

BOSTON — Given some help from the umpires and even more from the Cardinals, the Boston Red Sox turned the World Series opener into a laugher.

Mike Napoli hit a three-run double after the umpires reversed a blown call, Jon Lester made an early lead stand up and the Red Sox romped past sloppy St. Louis 8-1 Wednesday night for their ninth straight World Series win.

David Ortiz was robbed of a grand slam by Carlos Beltran — a catch that sent the star right fielder to a hospital with bruised ribs — but Ortiz later hit a two-run homer following third baseman David Freese's bad throw.

The Red Sox also capitalized on two errors by shortstop Pete Kozma to extend a Series winning streak that began when they swept St. Louis in 2004. Boston never trailed in those four games.

It got so bad for St. Louis on Wednesday that the sellout crowd laughed when pitcher Adam Wainwright and catcher Yadier Molina let a popup drop untouched between them.

Serious-minded St. Louis manager Mike Matheny didn't find anything funny, especially when the umpires huddled in the first inning and flipped a call by Dana DeMuth at second base.

The six-man crew correctly ruled that Kozma had not caught a soft toss from second baseman Matt Carpenter on a slow grounder by Ortiz.

“There's five of us out here, OK? And all five of us agreed 100 percent that it wasn't a catch. Our job is to get it right,” crew chief John Hirschbeck told Matheny on audio played on the Fox telecast.

Dustin Pedroia was ruled safe, and the bases were loaded in the first. Mike Napoli unloaded them with a double that rolled to the Green Monster in left-center.

The Red Sox added to their 3-0 lead with two more runs in the second. A fielding error by Kozma set up Pedroia's RBI single.

Ortiz, who hit a tying grand slam at Fenway in the AL championship series win over Detroit, sent a long drive to right-center. Beltran, playing in his first World Series, braced himself with one hand on the low wall in front of the bullpen and reached over with his glove to make the catch.

Beltran hurt himself on the play, however, and left in the third inning.

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