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World Series notebook: Opinions abound on obstruction ruling

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, 7:45 p.m.
 

ST. LOUIS — By Sunday morning, most everyone had become an expert on the obstruction rule.

“Worst ending to a World Series game ever!” PGA golfer Hunter Mahan tweeted.

“Obstruction of justice,” Arizona Cardinals kicker Jay Feely wrote.

No matter that the Official Baseball Rules have a slightly different take on what happened between the Cardinals and Red Sox in Game 3 at Busch Stadium.

But anytime someone scores the winning run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning without even touching home plate — called safe on an extremely rare ruling by an umpire — it's bound to cause a little ruckus.

On this point, all sides seemed to agree: Allen Craig's wild trip over Boston third baseman Will Middlebrooks likely made for the most crazy, chaotic October finish of all-time.

“As a baseball fan, you hate to see a game end like that,” pitcher Adam Wainwright said Sunday before Game 4. “Obviously, I'm on the Cardinals, so I'm fortunate the rule is the way it is. And you hate to say it, but he impeded the process of running home.”

“But I totally understand why Red Sox players would be upset about that. That is just a horrible way to lose a baseball game, no question about it,” he said.

Bad back shelves Boston's Victorino

Red Sox right fielder Shane Victorino did not start in Game 4 because of lower-back tightness.

Victorino was batting second in the batting order but was scratched about 75 minutes before the scheduled first pitch.

Daniel Nava was moved from left field to right and from fifth to second in the batting order.

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