Share This Page
MLB

Red Sox beat Cardinals, take 3-2 lead in World Series

| Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, 11:18 p.m.
Getty Images
The Red Sox's Jonny Gomes celebrates an RBI double by David Ross against the Cardinals in the seventh inning of Game 5 of the World Series on Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in St. Louis.

ST. LOUIS — Jon Lester smothered St. Louis on four hits into the eighth, David Ross hit a tiebreaking RBI double in a two-run seventh inning off Adam Wainwright, and the Boston Red Sox beat the Cardinals, 3-1, on Monday night to take a 3-2 World Series lead.

David Ortiz's RBI double in the first put the Red Sox ahead until Matt Holliday hit his second home run of the Series in the fourth, ending a 16 13-inning Series scoreless streak for Lester dating to 2007.

In a rematch of the opener, won by the Red Sox, 8-1, Lester again beat Wainwright, striking out seven and walking one in 7 23 innings. Koji Uehara got four outs to finish the four-hitter for his second save.

Boston can win its third title in a decade Wednesday night when the Series resumes at Fenway Park, where the Red Sox haven't won a championship on their home field since 1918. John Lackey starts for Boston and rookie Michael Wacha for St. Louis in a rematch of Game 2, won by the Cardinals, 4-2.

In the 42 previous times the Series has been tied 2-2, the Game 5 winner has taken the title 27 times — but just three of the past 10.

Wainwright fell behind nine pitches in. Dustin Pedroia doubled with one out, sending a hanging curveball into left field. Ortiz pulled the next pitch between Allen Craig and first base and down the right-field line.

Xander Bogaerts singled with one in the seventh, and Stephen Drew walked. Ross then hit a ground-rule double to left field for the 2-1 lead. An out later, Jacoby Ellsbury singled to center, scoring Drew. But Ross was thrown at home plate to end the inning.

Wainwright allowed all three runs and eight hits in seven innings, with 10 strikeouts and a walk.

Ortiz is batting .733 (11 for 15) in the Series with two homers and six RBIs. His six hits in six straight at-bats were one shy of the record, set by the New York Yankees' Thurman Munson (1976-77) and matched by Cincinnati's Billy Hatcher (1990). With three walks added, Ortiz tied the record for most consecutive plate appearances reaching by a hit, walk or hit batter, set by Hatcher.

Allen Craig was not in the Cardinals' original lineup but started at first base in place of the slumping Matt Adams. Craig sprained a ligament in his left foot and had not played in the field since Sept. 4.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.