Share This Page
MLB

MLB notebook: World Series threats spur arrest

| Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013, 7:57 p.m.

St. Louis police arrested a social media manager for allegedly making online threats invoking the Boston Marathon bombings as the Red Sox prepared to play the Cardinals at Busch Stadium in the World Series.

A probable cause statement released Tuesday said Robert Metzinger's former employer at a St. Louis marketing firm alerted police last week to several threatening Twitter posts from an account that has since been disabled. Police say the tweets referenced the April bombings and the use of a pressure cooker.

The probable cause statement did not quote the tweets directly but referred to an “implied threat to use an explosive device in or around the area of Busch Stadium during the upcoming World Series.”

Ticket prices soar

Ticket prices for Wednesday's Game 6 of the World Series in Boston's Fenway Park reached Super Bowl levels. The chance to see the Red Sox win the championship for the first time at home since 1918 drove the average cost of a ticket up to $2,056 on the resale market, according to information obtained by ESPN through TiqIQ, a ticket tracking company.

A's Reddick has surgery

Athletics right fielder Josh Reddick underwent surgery on his troublesome right wrist. Reddick, who batted .226 with 12 homers and 56 RBIs in 114 games after winning a 2012 Gold Glove, should be ready for the start of spring training.

Pena, Tigers part ways

The Tigers are ready to move on without backup catcher Brayan Pena. A team spokesman said Pena's agent reached out to the Tigers, and the team said at this point it is looking in a different direction. He hit .297 as the primary backup to Alex Avila this season.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.