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MLB

MLB notebook: Rodriguez walks out of own grievance hearing

| Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez walked out of his grievance hearing Wednesday after arbitrator Fredric Horowitz refused to order baseball Commissioner Bud Selig to testify.

Horowitz was in the midst of the 11th day of hearings on the grievance filed by the players' association to overturn the 211-game suspension given to Rodriguez by Major League Baseball last summer for alleged violations of the sport's drug agreement and labor contract.

“I'm done. I don't have a chance. You let the arbiter decide whatever he decides,” Rodriguez said during an interview on WFAN radio. “My position doesn't change. I didn't do it.”

A person familiar with the session said that after Horowitz made his ruling, the New York Yankees third baseman slammed a table, uttered a profanity at MLB Chief Operating Officer Rob Manfred and left. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because what takes place at the hearing is supposed to be confidential.

“I am disgusted with this abusive process, designed to ensure that the player fails,” Rodriguez said in a statement.

Carpenter to retire

Cardinals pitcher ChrisCarpenter told the team he plans to make his retirement official, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Wednesday.

When Carpenter was healthy, he was considered one of the best starting pitchers in the game. He won the National League Cy Young Award in 2005 and the NL Comeback Player of the Year award in 2009. He also was named to three All-Star teams.

Carpenter made his major league debut with the Blue Jays in 1997 and came to the Cardinals as a free agent in 2002. He has a 144-94 career record.

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