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MLB

MLB notebook: Dodgers' Kemp cleared for on-field activity

| Sunday, March 2, 2014, 4:12 p.m.

Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp was cleared to take the next steps in his recovery from ankle surgery — and those steps can be taken on the field.

The latest MRI on Kemp's surgically repaired left ankle was read by Dodgers team physician Neal ElAttrache and Robert Anderson, the surgeon who performed the microfracture procedure on Kemp's damaged talus bone. Kemp was given the go-ahead to increase his on-field activities, including running.

“I never thought running would be so fun,” Kemp said jokingly to reporters.

The Dodgers have just 16 games in 14 days left in Arizona, and Kemp is unlikely to play in any of those.

Veteran pitcher Mota retires

Reliever Guillermo Mota announced he is retiring after 14 major league seasons. Mota was a non-roster invitee to the Royals camp and did not pitch last season. The 40-year-old right-hander made 743 career relief appearances with a 3.94 ERA for seven teams.

Rangers' Choo sits with sore arm

Rangers outfielder Shin-Soo Choo was out of the lineup Sunday against the White Sox because of soreness in his left arm. Rangers assistant general manager Thad Levine said Choo has stiffness in his triceps and will be given a day or two off.

Blue Jays' Rasmus out of lineup

Blue Jays outfielder Colby Rasmus was scratched from Sunday's lineup against the Yankees because of a stiff neck. Rasmus, who batted .276 with 22 home runs and 66 RBIs last season, was scheduled to hit seventh but opted to sit as a precaution.

Dodgers send infielder to Indians

The Indians acquired infielder Justin Sellers from the Dodgers for cash considerations. The Indians also said that they designated infielder David Cooper for assignment. The 28-year-old Sellers played 82 games for the Dodgers in the past three years, hitting .199 with three home runs and 17 RBIs.

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