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MLB notebook: Reds' Latos has MRI on sore forearm

| Saturday, April 12, 2014, 6:57 p.m.

Reds starter Mat Latos had an MRI on his sore pitching forearm Saturday, a new problem that leaves him unsure of the next step in his recovery from a knee injury.

The right-hander had surgery to remove bone chips from his elbow after last season. His comeback was on schedule until he tore cartilage in his left knee while throwing in February. He had surgery the day the Reds opened camp.

Latos was scratched from a rehab start in the minors this week because of elbow soreness. He threw Friday but had to stop when his forearm became sore.

BoSox closer still ailing

Red Sox closer Koji Uehara is still out because of stiffness in his right shoulder, and it's uncertain when he will pitch again.

Red Sox manager John Farrell said Uehara was unavailable for Saturday's game at Yankee Stadium. Uehara felt discomfort during warmups Friday night.

The 39-year-old Uehara starred last season as Boston won the World Series title.

Cards' GM signs new deal

The Cardinals extended the contract of general manager John Mozeliak for two years through the 2018 season.

Mozeliak, 45, has been with the Cardinals organization for the past 19 seasons, the past six as GM. During Mozeliak's tenure, the Cardinals have been to the postseason four times, winning two NL pennants, and a World Series in 2011.

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