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MLB

MLB notebook: Brewers plan to unveil Uecker statue

| Monday, April 21, 2014, 8:18 p.m.

• White Sox left-hander Chris Sale is headed to the 15-day disabled list with what the team believes is a strained muscle in his throwing arm. General manager Rick Hahn said the White Sox are erring on the side of caution, and that an MRI suggests no ligament damage. The 25-year-old Sale threw 127 pitches in a loss to Boston on Thursday.

• The Brewers plan a private unveiling of a last-row statue paying tribute to broadcaster Bob Uecker. Milwaukee said Monday the bronze statue will be unveiled in a ceremony open to special guests and the media. The team plans to honor Uecker on the field before Friday night's game against the Chicago Cubs.

• Bobby Abreu got a quick lesson in the Mets' many uniform color combinations from an equipment guy, tried on a few belts in the clubhouse and then hugged new teammate Bartolo Colon. Always smart for 40-year-olds to stick together in the big leagues. The Mets called up Abreu from the minors Monday night, hoping the former star outfielder can provide a few key hits. He wasn't in New York's starting lineup against the Cardinals. Abreu hasn't been in the majors since 2012.

• Rockies outfielder Michael Cuddyer will go on the 15-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring.

• The Indians activated designated hitter Jason Giambi from the disabled list. Giambi missed Cleveland's first 18 games.

• Outfielder J.D. Martinez was brought up by the Tigers after a torrid stretch at Triple-A Toledo.

— AP

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