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MLB notebook: Things getting Uggla for Braves second baseman

| Sunday, July 13, 2014, 6:21 p.m.

Dan Uggla's future in Atlanta was in question Sunday after the Braves suspended the struggling second baseman for their final game before the All-Star break. The team announced the suspension on its Twitter feed, with no further explanation. Manager Fredi Gonzalez declined to elaborate when asked about the punishment before the Braves' game against the Cubs. “I'm not going to say anything other than that it's an internal matter,” he said. The 34-year-old Uggla has played sparingly since rookie Tommy La Stella was promoted from Triple-A Gwinnett on May 28. Uggla, a three-time All-Star, is batting .162 with two homers and 10 RBIs in 48 games.

• San Francisco'sTim Hudson, Cincinnati's Alfredo Simon, San Diego's Huston Street and Washington's Tyler Clippard were added to the roster for Tuesday's All-Star game at Target Field as the National League changed about one-third of its pitching staff. They replace a quartet of pitchers who started Sunday: the Giants' Madison Bumgarner, the Reds'Johnny Cueto, the Padres' Tyson Ross and the Braves'Julio Teheran.

• The Angels placed outfielder Collin Cowgill on the 15-day disabled list with fractures to his nose and right thumb, and recalled infielder Grant Green from Triple-A Salt Lake. Cowgill was injured Saturday night when he missed a bunt.

• The Athletics activated left-handed pitcher Drew Pomeranz from the 15-day disabled list and optioned him to Triple-A Sacramento.

Babe Ruth's 1918 contract with the Red Sox sold for more than $1 million at a baseball memorabilia auction in Baltimore. The contract was among 200 Ruth-related items auctioned one day after the 100th anniversary of Ruth's major league debut. A recently discovered Ruth bat from 1916 to 1918 sold for $214,000.

— Wire reports

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