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MLB notebook: Rose could play role in next year's All-Star game

| Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 7:51 p.m.

Pete Rose may have a role to play in next year's All-Star game in Cincinnati despite his lifetime ban from baseball.

The career hits leader generally is not allowed in any areas of major league ballparks not open to fans. But the former Reds star was allowed to participate in baseball's All-Century team ceremony at Atlanta's Turner Field during the 1999 World Series and was permitted to be on the field at Great American Ballpark in 2010 for a ceremony commemorating the 25th anniversary of his record-setting 4,192nd hit.

The Reds host the 2015 All-Star game July 14, and commissioner Bud Selig left open the possibility Rose could play a part.

“That will be up to the Cincinnati club, and they know what they can do and can't do,” Selig told the Baseball Writers' Association of America on Tuesday.

Selig: No knowledge of exemption for A-Rod

Selig maintained the league had no idea Alex Rodriguez received a medical exemption from the sport's drug administrator to use a testosterone-boosting substance in 2007.

Rodriguez received a therapeutic use exemption for the otherwise-banned substance clomid, according to the book “Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis and the Quest to End Baseball's Steroid Era,” which was published last week.

Bean to help with league's inclusion efforts

Major League Baseball appointed former outfielder Billy Bean, who came out as gay after his playing career, to serve as a consultant in guiding the sport toward greater inclusion and equality.

Bean will provide guidance and training related to efforts designed to support the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community throughout baseball.

Astros' handling of picks questioned

The head of the players' association thinks the Astros have manipulated baseball's rules in an attempt to save money in their negotiations with top draft picks Brady Aiken and Jacob Nix.

Aiken originally was offered a deal with a $6.5 million signing bonus by the Astros, a person familiar with the negotiations said. But the Astros expressed a concern over Aiken's elbow ligament and are now offering $3,168,840, the person said, an amount 40 percent of the slot's value of $7,922,100.

Nix was offered a $1.5 million bonus, the person said, but the Astros won't finalize his deal unless they reach a deal with Aiken.

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