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MLB

MLB notebook: Cubs sue fake mascot after bar fight

| Saturday, July 19, 2014, 8:09 p.m.

The Cubs filed a lawsuit against several people whom the team accuses of being behind a fake mascot that has been engaging in bad behavior near Wrigley Field, including getting into a bar fight that was captured on video and posted online.

The team filed its lawsuit Friday in federal court in Chicago against John Paul Weier, Patrick Weier and three other unnamed individuals whom the team says dress in the bear costume, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

The team accuses those behind the fake mascot of demanding tips for photos, making “rude, profane and derogatory remarks and gesticulations,” and punching a man at a bar near the ballpark.

Angels trade for Street

The Angels acquired All-Star closer Huston Street and prospect Trevor Gott from the Padres for minor leaguers Taylor Lindsey, R.J. Alvarez, Jose Rondon and Elliot Morris.

Street (1-0) has 24 saves in 25 opportunities and a 1.09 ERA in 33 games this season.

“Losing is a miserable experience,” Street said. “I believe in the Padres' ownership. They want to win, and they are not content with status quo. I blame the players for what's happened here.”

Extra bases

The Red Sox activated right fielder Shane Victorino from the 15-day disabled list. ... Rangers outfielder Alex Rios left their game against the Blue Jays in the first inning after spraining his right ankle on a swing.

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