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MLB notebook: Selig won't waver on Rose's lifetime ban

| Friday, Aug. 22, 2014, 8:12 p.m.

• Commissioner Bud Selig hasn't changed his outlook on Pete Rose's lifetime ban for gambling. Selig visited Cincinnati on Friday for the opening of an urban youth academy, then drove down Pete Rose Way to visit Great American Ball Park and the Cincinnati Reds Museum, which contains many references to baseball's hits leader. Selig declined to talk about Rose's chances for reinstatement before he leaves office in January and gave no indication he will lift his ban.

• Any Orioles postseason run this year will be without third baseman Manny Machado. Machado, on the disabled list with what the team diagnosed as a right knee sprain, will have season-ending surgery, according to an industry source. Machado, 22, injured his right knee Aug. 12 when he fell to the ground following through on a swing.

• Red Sox manager John Farrell calls outfielder Rusney Castillo “an exciting, athletic player.” The Cuban defector is expected to show off those talents for Boston soon, perhaps within the next week. Farrell spoke Friday amid media reports that the Red Sox agreed with Castillo on a $72.5 million, seven-year contract.

• Indians catcher Yan Gomes has been diagnosed with a concussion, and there's no timetable for when he'll return to the lineup. Gomes was hit on the mask after a pitch deflected off Minnesota's Kurt Suzuki on Thursday. Gomes is batting .284 with 17 homers and 53 RBIs.

• The Yankees will retire Joe Torre's No. 6 and unveil a Monument Park plaque to honor their former manager before Saturday's game against the White Sox.

— Wire reports

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