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Knicks agree to trade Carmelo Anthony to Thunder

| Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017, 8:36 p.m.
In this March 27, 2017, photo, New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony (7) reacts after hitting a 3-point shot against the Detroit Pistons during the second quarter of an NBA basketball game in New York. The Knicks agreed to trade Anthony to the Thunder on Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017, saving themselves a potentially awkward reunion next week with the player they'd been trying to deal since last season.  New York will get Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a draft pick, a person with knowledge of the deal said. The person spoke with The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been announced.
AP Photo/Julie Jacobson
In this March 27, 2017, photo, New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony (7) reacts after hitting a 3-point shot against the Detroit Pistons during the second quarter of an NBA basketball game in New York. The Knicks agreed to trade Anthony to the Thunder on Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017, saving themselves a potentially awkward reunion next week with the player they'd been trying to deal since last season. New York will get Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a draft pick, a person with knowledge of the deal said. The person spoke with The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been announced.

NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony won't be at Knicks training camp after all. He will be in Oklahoma City, joining Russell Westbrook and Paul George in a loaded lineup.

The Knicks agreed to trade Anthony to the Thunder on Saturday, saving themselves a potentially awkward reunion next week with the player they had been trying to deal since last season.

New York will get Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a draft pick, a person with knowledge of the deal said.

The Knicks had said just a day earlier that they expected Anthony to be there when they reported for camp Monday. But it was clear they didn't want him anymore and he no longer wanted to be in New York, where he arrived with so much hype that was never fulfilled in February 2011.

He rarely had a championship core around him in New York but jumps right into one in Oklahoma City along with Westbrook, the NBA MVP, and fellow All-Star George, who was acquired from Indiana this summer.

Anthony will see his old teammates soon: The Knicks open the regular season at Oklahoma City on Oct. 19.

Anthony agreed to waive his no-trade clause to complete the deal.

Phil Jackson spent the latter part of his time in New York making it clear he wanted to move Anthony. But a deal was difficult because the 33-year-old forward has two years and about $54 million left on his contract, along with the ability to decline any trade.

He had long maintained that he wanted to stay in New York, but the constant losing and a chance to play with a talented lineup convinced him it was finally time to go.

The trade ends an unfulfilling 6 12-year run in New York for Anthony, where he could never shake his reputation of an elite scorer who can't carry a team to a ring. The Knicks made the playoffs his first three seasons and reached the second round in 2013, when Anthony led the league with 28.7 points per game. But after that they never seriously proved they could do anything consistently beyond make headlines.

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