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Nation, World Sports

How to watch the Winter Olympics on more than just your TV

Aaron Aupperlee
| Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, 10:00 a.m.
A general view during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Village opening ceremony at the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Village Plaza on Feb. 1, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea.
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A general view during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Village opening ceremony at the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Village Plaza on Feb. 1, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea.
Jang Hyeji of Republic of Korea sweeps the ice against China in the curling mixed doubles round robin session 2 during the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Curling Centre on Feb. 8, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea.
Getty Images
Jang Hyeji of Republic of Korea sweeps the ice against China in the curling mixed doubles round robin session 2 during the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Curling Centre on Feb. 8, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea.
Ema Klinec of Slovenia jumps during ski jumping practice at Alpensia Ski Jumping Centre on Feb. 8, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea.
Getty Images
Ema Klinec of Slovenia jumps during ski jumping practice at Alpensia Ski Jumping Centre on Feb. 8, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea.

The 2018 Winter Olympics have begun on the other side of the Pacific Ocean in Pyeongchang, South Korea, but the gliding and sliding action will be live-streamed to your phones, tablets and even virtual reality headsets throughout the games.

NBC is the sole provider of Olympics coverage in the United States, but the network and its partners will provide possibly more ways than ever to watch your favorite sports.

NBC will air the Opening Ceremonies at 8 p.m. Friday.

In Virtual Reality

NBC and Intel will broadcast more than 30 events in VR. The pair is claiming that it is the first time ever fans can enjoy the thrill of ski jumping, the speed of luge or skeleton and the grace of figure skating in immersive 360-degree video on their VR headsets or their smartphones strapped inside a Google Cardboard of similar device. Some events will be streamed live while others will be available on demand. A full schedule is available here .

Intel's True VR system will uses video pods with up to 12 4K-resolution cameras to capture the action. The system expects to generate up to one terabyte an hour of data.

Instructions to set up your VR experience are available here .

On Snapchat

Snapchat is debuting its live video tool at the Olympics in a partnership with NBC. The new Live feature will allow NBC to stream live video from the games to Snapchat's Discover section. The live segments will be between two and six minutes.

Expect a wider rollout of the Live tool after the Olympics but don't expect to be able to use it right away. Recode reported that Live will only be available to Snapchat's publishing partners at launch.

Streaming

NBC will live stream events at www.nbcolympics.com and on the NBC Sports app for smartphones and tablets. The NBC Sports channel available on streaming devices like Google Chromecast, Roku and Apple TV, will also give you access to programming. NBC will give you 30 free minutes on your first session and then five free minutes each day after. Unlimited streaming is available with a cable, satellite or digital subscription.

There are plenty of TV streaming services — Hulu, Sling TV, DirecTV Now, PlayStation Vue, YouTube TV and Fubo TV, a sports-dedicated service — that may offer NBC depending on your market. Check before you sign up. Most offer a free trial for several days.

You can also use a virtual private network to pretend you live in some other country where the Olympics will be streamed for free — like on the BBC in the United Kingdom. You'll probably have to pay for the VPN service but chances are if you're actually considering this route to Olympic glory, you already have one.

On TV

Of course, if you have a television and a healthy cable package, you can catch 631.5 hours of sports coverage spread across NBC, NBC Sports Network, USA Network and CNBC. NBC's The Olympics Channel will have wall-to-wall, 24/7 news coverage including medal ceremonies.

Non-cable viewers will be able to catch daily primetime coverage during the week and daytime and primetime coverage on weekends.

Aaron Aupperlee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at aaupperlee@tribweb.com, 412-336-8448 or via Twitter @tinynotebook.

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