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Nation, World Sports

Big names skipping Byron Nelson as PGA event switches venues

| Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 7:00 p.m.
Jordan Spieth watches his ball after hitting from the fairway on the first hole during the pro-am at the AT&T Byron Nelson golf tournament at Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News via AP)
Jordan Spieth watches his ball after hitting from the fairway on the first hole during the pro-am at the AT&T Byron Nelson golf tournament at Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. (Vernon Bryant/The Dallas Morning News via AP)

DALLAS — Jordan Spieth didn't try to sell his peers on joining him at a new links-style course for the 50th anniversary of his hometown AT&T Byron Nelson tournament.

The three-time major winner said he was honest when asked over the past year about the undulating layout, with no trees or water hazards, on what used to be a landfill a few miles south of downtown Dallas.

The fields weren't great the past decade at TPC Four Seasons resort in suburban Irving, the tournament's home for 35 years. The return to Dallas at Trinity Forest Golf Club, named for the 6,000 acres of thick trees surrounding the course, didn't do much to change that, at least for now.

“The most common question is, ‘What's it like?' ” Spieth said. “Pretty vague question but, you know, I say it's very different. These are my words: It's really fun as a member, as a change-of-pace kind of golf club.”

Spieth (No. 3) and ninth-ranked Hideki Matsuyama, making his Nelson debut Thursday, are the only players from the world top 10 in the field. Sergio Garcia, the Nelson winner two years ago and 2017 Masters champ, is next at 14th.

Whether it's scheduling, losing the amenities of a resort or facing an unfamiliar brand of PGA Tour golf, most of the big names are staying away. Billy Horschel admitted he probably wouldn't be at the course co-designed by Ben Crenshaw if he weren't the defending champion.

“Look, most people just don't like different, do they?” asked Adam Scott, the 2008 Nelson champ playing the event for the first time in six years. “This is just different than what we normally roll out and play.”

Wind will determine the difficulty on the par-71 layout. Thursday is supposed to be calm, with winds expected to pick up Friday and Saturday into the 20 mph range — a number Geoff Ogilvy used a threshold for things getting “interesting.”

“You have to ask Jordan or the members who play out here into crazy winds because I haven't seen it yet,” Ogilvy said. “Nothing to stop the wind. Pretty exposed place.”

Spieth is talking up the par-3 No. 17 because of a green with a large mound through the middle that Crenshaw said was the natural part of the landscape. A double green for the third and 11th holes is billed as the largest on an 18-hole course in North America.

The short par-4 fifth will be one to watch because it's easily reachable off the tee — especially with a prevailing south wind — and easily could be a big source of trouble. The finishing hole on each nine is a par-4 of more than 500 yards.

“Like everything here in the U.S., the greens are bigger, the fairways are bigger, but it's the closest thing you can get to a links course,” said Garcia, who is from Spain. “It's an American links course.”

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