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Belmont distance, fatigue to test Justify after Preakness win

| Sunday, May 20, 2018, 4:36 p.m.
Justify, with Mike Smith atop, wins the 143rd Preakness Stakes just ahead of Bravazo, with Luis Saez aboard, Saturday.
Justify, with Mike Smith atop, wins the 143rd Preakness Stakes just ahead of Bravazo, with Luis Saez aboard, Saturday.

BALTIMORE — Justify keeps showing something new each time he races.

In the Kentucky Derby, he showed he could run in the mud in a crowded, 20-horse field. In the Preakness, he showed he could withstand the challenge of a top rival pressing him early and hold off others before the finish line — also in the mud.

For his next trick, he will need to show he can endure the grueling 1 12-mile Belmont on June 9. And it he does that, Justify will become horse racing's second Triple Crown winner in four years.

“If you're a superior horse, you can do it,” trainer Bob Baffert said Sunday. “I've seen horses go a mile and a half, and they never won again. It's a weird, quirky race, but I don't see why though he wouldn't handle it.”

Had the Preakness been another tenth of a mile, a hard-charging Bravazo might have passed Justify and ended the Triple Crown bid Saturday. Bravazo will go to the Belmont, where Justify will have plenty of familiar challenges — and a fresh ones — standing in the way of becoming the 13th horse to win the Triple Crown.

In addition to Bravazo, Kentucky Derby horses Hofburg, Vino Rosso and Free Drop Billy and Preakness horse Tenfold are among those likely to challenge Justify in what is considered the most difficult race on the Triple Crown trail.

Bravazo is “a tough little horse, and I think his pedigree will let him run that far,” trainer D. Wayne Lukas said. “So, we'll take him on and see what happens.”

Justify's run in the Kentucky Derby was convincing enough to scare off a few opposing owners and trainers from the Preakness. Given the fatigue of difficult races two weeks apart, they could see Justify as beatable at the Belmont.

Baffert, who had three near-misses with Silver Charm, Real Quiet and War Emblem before American Pharoah broke the 37-year Triple Crown drought in 2015, said Justify is built to power through the fatigue caused by running on the slop twice against high-caliber competition.

“You do hate to keep running on these wet tracks because it does take a little bit out of them,” Baffert said. “It can be tough. It's not as tough on him because he's a big horse. He can handle it. He was blowing pretty good. He got a good blow out of (the Preakness), but he wasn't as tired as we thought he was.”

As gassed as Justify looked at the wire in the Preakness, jockey Mike Smith is convinced the undefeated colt could have run longer and picked up the pace if asked. Finishing a half-length ahead of Bravazo made it by far Justify's closest victory of his five, but it counts just the same.

“Although he got tired (Saturday), he was also looking around a bit at the end,” Smith said. “I certainly could have got after him a whole lot more a lot earlier and made him do a little more, as well.”

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